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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

extreme and often repeated cases of indefinite prolongation of 

pronounced erection without detumescence, but it is not true 

within fairly wide limits in the case of healthy persons. 

Prolonged _coitus reservatus_ was a practice of the complex 

marriage system of the Oneida community, and I was assured by the 

late Noyes Miller, who had spent the greater part of his life in 

the community, that the practice had no sort of evil result. 

_Coitus reservatus_ was erected into a principle in the Oneida 

community. Every man in the community was theoretically the 

husband of every woman, but every man was not free to have 

children with every woman. Sexual initiation took place soon 

after puberty in the case of boys, some years later in the case 

of girls, by a much older person of the opposite sex. In 

intercourse the male inserted his penis into the vagina and 

retained it there for even an hour without emission, though 

orgasm took place in the woman. There was usually no emission in 

the case of the man, even after withdrawal, and he felt no need 

of emission. The social feeling of the community was a force on 

the side of this practice, the careless, unskilful men being 

avoided by women, while the general romantic sentiment of 

affection for all the women in the community was also a force. 

Masturbation was unknown, and no irregular relations took place 

with persons outside the community. The practice was maintained 

for thirty years, and was finally abandoned, not on its demerits, 

but in deference to the opinions of the outside world. Mr. Miller 

admitted that the practice became more difficult in ordinary 

marriage, which favors a more mechanical habit of intercourse. 

The information received from Mr. Miller is supplemented in a 

pamphlet entitled _Male Continence_ (the name given to _coitus 

reservatus_ in the community), written in 1872 by the founder, 

John Humphrey Noyes. The practice is based, he says, on the fact 

that sexual intercourse consists of two acts, a social and a 

propagative, and that if propagation is to be scientific there 

must be no confusion of these two acts, and procreation must 

never be involuntary. It was in 1844, he states, that this idea 

occurred to him as a result of a resolve to abstain from sexual 

intercourse in consequence of his wife's delicate health and 

inability to bear healthy children, and in his own case he found 

the practice "a great deliverance. It made a happy household." He 

points out that the chief members of the Oneida community 

"belonged to the most respectable families in Vermont, had been 

educated in the best schools of New England morality and 

refinement, and were, by the ordinary standards, irreproachable 

in their conduct so far as sexual matters are concerned, till 

they deliberately commenced, in 1846, the experiment of a new 

state of society, on principles which they had been long maturing 

and were prepared to defend before the World." In relation to 

male continence, therefore, Noyes thought the community might 

fairly be considered "the Committee of Providence to test its 

value in actual life." He states that a careful medical 

comparison of the statistics of the community had shown that the 

rate of nervous disease in the community was considerably below 

the average outside, and that only two cases of nervous disorder 

had occurred which could be traced with any probability to a 

misuse of male continence. This has been confirmed by Van de 


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