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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

It is undoubtedly true that coitus interruptus, since it involves 

sudden withdrawal on the part of the man without reference to the 

stage of sexual excitation which his partner may have reached, 

cannot fail to produce frequently an injurious nervous effect on 

the woman, though the injurious effect on the man, who obtains 

ejaculation, is little or none. But the practice is so widespread 

that it cannot be regarded as necessarily involving this evil 

result. There can, I am assured, be no doubt whatever that 

Blumreich is justified in his statement (Senator and Kaminer, 

_Health and Disease in Relation to Marriage_, vol. ii, p. 783) 

that "interrupted coitus is injurious to the genital system of 

those women only who are disturbed in their sensation of delight 

by this form of cohabitation, in whom the orgasm is not produced, 

and who continue for hours subsequently to be tormented by 

feelings of an unsatisfied desire." Equally injurious effects 

follow in normal coitus when the man's orgasm occurs too soon. 

"These phenomena, therefore," he concludes, "are not 

characteristic of interrupted coitus, but consequences of an 

imperfectly concluded sexual cohabitation as such." Kisch, 

likewise, in his elaborate and authoritative work on _The Sexual 

Life of Woman_, also states that the question of the evil results 

of _coitus interruptus_ in women is simply a question of whether 

or not they receive sexual satisfaction. (Cf. also Fuerbringer, 

_Health and Disease in Relation to Marriage_, vol. i, pp. 232 _et 

seq._) This is clearly the most reasonable view to take 

concerning what is the simplest, the most widespread, and 

certainly the most ancient of the methods of preventing 

conception. In the Book of Genesis we find it practiced by Onan, 

and to come down to modern times, in the sixteenth century it 

seems to have been familiar to French ladies, who, according to 

Brantome, enjoined it on their lovers. 

 

Coitus reservatus,--in which intercourse is maintained even for 

very long periods, during which the woman may have orgasm several 

times while the man succeeds in holding back orgasm,--so far from 

being injurious to the woman, is probably the form of coitus 

which gives her the maximum of gratification and relief. For most 

men, however, it seems probable that this self-control over the 

processes leading to the involuntary act of detumescence is 

difficult to acquire, while in weak, nervous, and erethic persons 

it is impossible. It is, however, a desirable condition for 

completely adequate coitus, and in the East this is fully 

recognized, and the aptitude carefully cultivated. Thus W.D. 

Sutherland states ("Einiges ueber das Alltagsleben und die 

Volksmedizin unter den Bauern Britischostindiens," _Muenchener 

Medizinische Wochenschrift_, No. 12, 1906) that the Hindu smokes 

and talks during intercourse in order to delay orgasm, and 

sometimes applies an opium paste to the glans of the penis for 

the same purpose. (See also vol. iii of these _Studies_, "The 

Sexual Impulse in Women.") Some authorities have, indeed, stated 

that the prolongation of the act of coitus is injurious in its 

effect on the male. Thus R.W. Taylor (_Practical Treatise on 

Sexual Disorders_, third ed., p. 121) states that it tends to 

cause atonic impotence, and Loewenfeld (_Sexualleben und 

Nervenleiden_, p. 74) thinks that the swift and unimpeded 

culmination of the sexual act is necessary in order to preserve 

the vigor of the reflex reactions. This is probably true of 


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