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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

not always realized by the women who complain of his lack of skill in 

playing it. Although a man has not to cultivate the same natural duplicity 

as a woman, it is necessary that he should possess a considerable power of 

divination. He is not well prepared for that, because the traditional 

masculine virtue is force rather than insight. The male's work in the 

world, we are told, is domination, and it is by such domination that the 

female is attracted. There is an element of truth in that doctrine, an 

element of truth which may well lead astray the man who too exclusively 

relies upon it in the art of love. Violence is bad in every art, and in 

the erotic art the female desires to be won to love and not to be ordered 

to love. That is fundamental. We sometimes see the matter so stated as if 

the objection to force and domination in love constituted some quite new 

and revolutionary demand of the "modern woman." That is, it need scarcely 

be said, the result of ignorance. The art of love, being an art that 

Nature makes, is the same now as in essentials it has always been,[407] 

and it was well established before woman came into existence. That it has 

not always been very skilfully played is another matter. And, so far as 

the man is concerned, it is this very tradition of masculine predominance 

which has contributed to the difficulty of playing it skilfully. The woman 

admires the male's force; she even wishes herself to be forced to the 

things that she altogether desires; and yet she revolts from any exertion 

of force outside that narrow circle, either before the boundary of it is 

reached or after the boundary is passed. Thus the man's position is really 

more difficult than the women who complain of his awkwardness in love are 

always ready to admit. He must cultivate force, not only in the world but 

even for display in the erotic field; he must be able to divine the 

moments when, in love, force is no longer force because his own will is 

his partner's will; he must, at the same time, hold himself in complete 

restraint lest he should fall into the fatal error of yielding to his own 

impulse of domination; and all this at the very moment when his emotions 

are least under control. We need scarcely be surprised that of the myriads 

who embark on the sea of love, so few women, so very few men, come safely 

into port. 

 

It may still seem to some that in dwelling on the laws that guide the 

erotic life, if that life is to be healthy and complete, we have wandered 

away from the consideration of the sexual instinct in its relationship to 

society. It may therefore be desirable to return to first principles and 

to point out that we are still clinging to the fundamental facts of the 

personal and social life. Marriage, as we have seen reason to believe, is 

a great social institution; procreation, which is, on the public side, its 

supreme function, is a great social end. But marriage and procreation are 

both based on the erotic life. If the erotic life is not sound, then 

marriage is broken up, practically if not always formally, and the process 

of procreation is carried out under unfavorable conditions or not at all. 

 

This social and personal importance of the erotic life, though, under the 

influence of a false morality and an equally false modesty, it has 

sometimes been allowed to fall into the background in stages of artificial 

civilization, has always been clearly realized by those peoples who have 

vitally grasped the relationships of life. Among most uncivilized races 

there appear to be few or no "sexually frigid" women. It is little to the 

credit of our own "civilization" that it should be possible for physicians 


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