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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

nothing whatever that is absolute. There are a vast number of 

women whose sexual facility, again by natural tendency and not 

merely by acquired habits, is as marked as that of any man, if 

not more so. In the sexual field, as we have seen in a previous 

volume (_Analysis of the Sexual Impulse_), the range of 

variability is greater in women than in men. 

 

The fact that love is an art, a method of drawing music from an 

instrument, and not the mere commission of an act by mutual consent, makes 

any verbal agreement to love of little moment. If love were a matter of 

contract, of simple intellectual consent, of question and answer, it would 

never have come into the world at all. Love appeared as art from the 

first, and the subsequent developments of the summary methods of reason 

and speech cannot abolish that fundamental fact. This is scarcely realized 

by those ill-advised lovers who consider that the first step in 

courtship--and perhaps even the whole of courtship--is for a man to ask a 

woman to be his wife. That is so far from being the case that it 

constantly happens that the premature exhibition of so large a demand at 

once and for ever damns all the wooer's chances. It is lamentable, no 

doubt, that so grave and fateful a matter as that of marriage should so 

often be decided without calm deliberation and reasonable forethought. But 

sexual relationships can never, and should never, be merely a matter of 

cold calculation. When a woman is suddenly confronted by the demand that 

she should yield herself up as a wife to a man who has not yet succeeded 

in gaining her affections she will not fail to find--provided she is 

lifted above the cold-hearted motives of self-interest--that there are 

many sound reasons why she should not do so. And having thus squarely 

faced the question in cool blood and decided it, she will henceforth, 

probably, meet that wooer with a tunic of steel enclosing her breast. 

 

"Love must be _revealed_ by acts and not _betrayed_ by words. I 

regard as abnormal the extraordinary method of a hasty avowal 

beforehand; for that represents not the direct but the reflex 

path of transmission. However sweet and normal the avowal may be 

when once reciprocity has been realized, as a method of conquest 

I consider it dangerous and likely to produce the reverse of the 

result desired." I take these wise words from a thoughtful "Essai 

sur l'Amour" (_Archives de Psychologie_, 1904) by a 

non-psychological Swiss writer who is recording his own 

experiences, and who insists much on the predominance of the 

spiritual and mental element in love. 

 

 

It is worthy of note that this recognition that direct speech is 

out of place in courtship must not be regarded as a refinement of 

civilization. Among primitive peoples everywhere it is perfectly 

well recognized that the offer of love, and its acceptance or its 

refusal, must be made by actions symbolically, and not by the 

crude method of question and answer. Among the Indians of 

Paraguay, who allow much sexual freedom to their women, but never 

buy or sell love, Mantegazza states (_Rio de la Plata e 

Tenerife_, 1867, p. 225) that a girl of the people will come to 

your door or window and timidly, with a confused air, ask you, in 

the Guarani tongue, for a drink of water. But she will smile if 

you innocently offer her water. Among the Tarahumari Indians of 

Mexico, with whom the initiative in courting belongs to the 

women, the girl takes the first step through her parents, then 


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