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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Ambassador's son, in Rome in 1489, "knew a girl seven times in 

one hour" (J. Burchard, _Diarium_, ed. Thuasne, vol. i, p. 329). 

Olivier, Charlemagne's knight, boasted, according to legend, that 

he could show his virile power one hundred times in one night, if 

allowed to sleep with the Emperor of Constantinople's daughter; 

he was allowed to try, it is said, and succeeded thirty times 

(Schultz, _Das Hoefische Leben_, vol. i, p. 581). 

 

It will be seen that whenever the sexual act is repeated 

frequently within a short time it is very rarely indeed that the 

husband can keep pace with the wife. It is true that the woman's 

sexual energy is aroused more slowly and with more difficulty 

than the man's, but as it becomes aroused its momentum increases. 

The man, whose energy is easily aroused, is easily exhausted; the 

woman has often scarcely attained her energy until after the 

first orgasm is over. It is sometimes a surprise to a young 

husband, happily married, to find that the act of sexual 

intercourse which completely satisfies him has only served to 

arouse his wife's ardor. Very many women feel that the repetition 

of the act several times in succession is needed to, as they may 

express it, "clear the system," and, far from producing 

sleepiness and fatigue, it renders them bright and lively. 

 

The young and vigorous woman, who has lived a chaste life, 

sometimes feels when she commences sexual relationships as though 

she really required several husbands, and needed intercourse at 

least once a day, though later when she becomes adjusted to 

married life she reaches the conclusion that her desires are not 

abnormally excessive. The husband has to adjust himself to his 

wife's needs, through his sexual force when he possesses it, and, 

if not, through his skill and consideration. The rare men who 

possess a genital potency which they can exert to the 

gratification of women without injury to themselves have been, by 

Professor Benedikt, termed "sexual athletes," and he remarks that 

such men easily dominate women. He rightly regards Casanova as 

the type of the sexual athlete (_Archives d'Anthropologie 

Criminelle_, Jan., 1896). Naecke reports the case of a man whom he 

regards as a sexual athlete, who throughout his life had 

intercourse once or twice daily with his wife, or if she was 

unwilling, with another woman, until he became insane at the age 

of seventy-five (_Zeitschrift fuer Sexualwissenschaft_, Aug., 

1908, p. 507). This should probably, however, be regarded rather 

as a case of morbid hyperaesthesia than of sexual athleticism. 

 

At this stage we reach the fundamental elements of the art of love. We 

have seen that many moral practices and moral theories which have been 

widely current in Christendom have developed traditions, still by no means 

extinct among us, which were profoundly antagonistic to the art of love. 

The idea grew up of "marital duties," of "conjugal rights."[400] The 

husband had the right and the duty to perform sexual intercourse with his 

wife, whatever her wishes in the matter might be, while the wife had the 

duty and the right (the duty in her case being usually put first) to 

submit to such intercourse, which she was frequently taught to regard as 

something low and merely physical, an unpleasant and almost degrading 

necessity which she would do well to put out of her thoughts as speedily 

as possible. It is not surprising that such an attitude towards marriage 

has been highly favorable to conjugal unhappiness, more especially that of 


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