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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Breuer and Freud, in their _Studien ueber Hysterie_ (p. 216), 

pointed out that the bridal night is practically often a rape, 

and that it sometimes leads to hysteria, which is not cured until 

satisfying sexual relationships are established. Even when there 

is no violence, Kisch (_Sexual Life of Woman_, Part II) regards 

awkward and inexperienced coitus, leading to incomplete 

excitement of the wife, as the chief cause of dyspareunia, or 

absence of sexual gratification, although gross disproportion in 

the size of the male and female organs, or disease in either 

party, may lead to the same result. Dyspareunia, Kisch adds, is 

astonishingly frequent, though sometimes women complain of it 

without justification in order to arouse sympathy for themselves 

as sacrifices on the altar of marriage; the constant sign is 

absence of ejaculation on the woman's part. Kisch also observes 

that wedding night deflorations are often really rapes. One young 

bride, known to him, was so ignorant of the physical side of 

love, and so overwhelmed by her husband's first attempt at 

intercourse, that she fled from the house in the night, and 

nothing would ever persuade her to return to her husband. (It is 

worth noting that by Canon law, under such circumstances, the 

Church might hold the marriage invalid. See Thomas Slater's 

_Moral Theology_, vol. ii, p. 318, and a case in point, both 

quoted by Rev. C.J. Shebbeare, "Marriage Law in the Church of 

England," _Nineteenth Century_, Aug., 1909, p. 263.) Kisch 

considers, also, that wedding tours are a mistake; since the 

fatigue, the excitement, the long journeys, sight-seeing, false 

modesty, bad hotel arrangements, often combine to affect the 

bride unfavorably and produce the germs of serious illness. This 

is undoubtedly the case. 

 

The extreme psychic importance of the manner in which the act of 

defloration is accomplished is strongly emphasized by Adler. He 

regards it as a frequent cause of permanent sexual anaesthesia. 

"This first moment in which the man's individuality attains its 

full rights often decides the whole of life. The unskilled, 

over-excited husband can then implant the seed of feminine 

insensibility, and by continued awkwardness and coarseness 

develop it into permanent anaesthesia. The man who takes 

possession of his rights with reckless brutal masculine force 

merely causes his wife anxiety and pain, and with every 

repetition of the act increases her repulsion.... A large 

proportion of cold-natured women represent a sacrifice by men, 

due either to unconscious awkwardness, or, occasionally, to 

conscious brutality towards the tender plant which should have 

been cherished with peculiar art and love, but has been robbed of 

the splendor of its development. All her life long, a wistful and 

trembling woman will preserve the recollection of a brutal 

wedding night, and, often enough, it remains a perpetual source 

of inhibition every time that the husband seeks anew to gratify 

his desires without adapting himself to his wife's desires for 

love" (O. Adler, _Die Mangelhafte Geschlechtsempfindung des 

Weibes_, pp. 159 et seq., 181 et seq.). "I have seen an honest 

woman shudder with horror at her husband's approach," wrote 

Diderot long ago in his essay "Sur les Femmes"; "I have seen her 

plunge in the bath and feel herself never sufficiently washed 

from the stain of duty." The same may still be said of a vast 

army of women, victims of a pernicious system of morality which 


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