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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

of the wrongs done by Christianity to humanity, as the work of 

men with little enlightenment and bitter zeal, dangerous puritans 

who were the natural enemies of marriage" (Retif de la Bretonne, 

_Monsieur Nicolas_, reprint of 1883, vol. x, pp. 160-3). It may 

be added that Duehren (Dr. Iwan Bloch) regards Retif as "a master 

in the _Ars Amandi_," and discusses him from this point of view 

in his _Retif de la Bretonne_ (pp. 362-371). 

 

Whether or not Christianity is to be held responsible, it cannot be 

doubted that throughout Christendom there has been a lamentable failure to 

recognize the supreme importance, not only erotically but morally, of the 

art of love. Even in the great revival of sexual enlightenment now taking 

place around us there is rarely even the faintest recognition that in 

sexual enlightenment the one thing essentially necessary is a knowledge of 

the art of love. For the most part, sexual instruction as at present 

understood, is purely negative, a mere string of thou-shalt-nots. If that 

failure were due to the conscious and deliberate recognition that while 

the art of love must be based on physiological and psychological 

knowledge, it is far too subtle, too complex, too personal, to be 

formulated in lectures and manuals, it would be reasonable and sound. But 

it seems to rest entirely on ignorance, indifference, or worse. 

 

Love-making is indeed, like other arts, an art that is partly natural--"an 

art that nature makes"--and therefore it is a natural subject for learning 

and exercising in play. Children left to themselves tend, both playfully 

and seriously, to practice love, alike on the physical and the psychic 

sides.[381] But this play is on its physical side sternly repressed by 

their elders, when discovered, and on its psychic side laughed at. Among 

the well-bred classes it is usually starved out at an early age. 

 

After puberty, if not before, there is another form in which the art of 

love is largely experimented and practised, especially in England and 

America, the form of flirtation. In its elementary manifestations flirting 

is entirely natural and normal; we may trace it even in animals; it is 

simply the beginning of courtship, at the early stage when courtship may 

yet, if desired, be broken off. Under modern civilized conditions, 

however, flirtation is often more than this. These conditions make 

marriage difficult; they make love and its engagements too serious a 

matter to be entered on lightly; they make actual sexual intercourse 

dangerous as well as disreputable. Flirtation adapts itself to these 

conditions. Instead of being merely the preliminary stage of normal 

courtship, it is developed into a form of sexual gratification as complete 

as due observation of the conditions already mentioned will allow. In 

Germany, and especially in France where it is held in great abhorrence, 

this is the only form of flirtation known; it is regarded as an 

exportation from the United States and is denominated "flirtage." Its 

practical outcome is held to be the "demi-vierge," who knows and has 

experienced the joys of sex while yet retaining her hymen intact. 

 

This degenerate form of flirtation, cultivated not as a part of 

courtship, but for its own sake, has been well described by Forel 

(_Die Sexuelle Frage_, pp. 97-101). He defines it as including 

"all those expressions of the sexual instinct of one individual 

towards another individual which excite the other's sexual 

instinct, coitus being always excepted." In the beginning it may 

be merely a provocative look or a simple apparently unintentional 


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