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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

has been described by Zache ("Sitten und Gebraeuche der Suaheli," 

_Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1899, Heft 2-3, p. 72). The more 

accomplished dancers excite general admiration. During the latter 

part of this initiation various feats are imposed, to test the 

girl's skill and self-control. For instance, she must dance up to 

a fire and remove from the midst of the fire a vessel full of 

water to the brim, without spilling it. At the end of three 

months the training is over, and the girl goes home in festival 

attire. She is now eligible for marriage. Similar customs are 

said to prevail in the Dutch East Indies and elsewhere. 

 

The Hebrews had erotic dances, which were doubtless related to 

the art of love in marriage, and among the Greeks, and their 

disciples the Romans, the conception of love as an art which 

needs training, skill, and cultivation, was still extant. That 

conception was crushed by Christianity which, although it 

sanctified the institution of matrimony, degraded that sexual 

love which is normally the content of marriage. 

 

In 1176 the question was brought before a Court of Love by a 

baron and lady of Champagne, whether love is compatible with 

marriage. "No," said the baron, "I admire and respect the sweet 

intimacy of married couples, but I cannot call it love. Love 

desires obstacles, mystery, stolen favors. Now husbands and wives 

boldly avow their relationship; they possess each other without 

contradiction and without reserve. It cannot then be love that 

they experience." And after mature deliberation the ladies of the 

Court of Love adopted the baron's conclusions (E. de la 

Bedolliere, _Histoire des Moeurs des Francais_, vol. iii, p. 

334). There was undoubtedly an element of truth in the baron's 

arguments. Yet it may well be doubted whether in any 

non-Christian country it would ever have been possible to obtain 

acceptance for the doctrine that love and marriage are 

incompatible. This doctrine was, however, as Ribot points out in 

his _Logique des Sentiments_, inevitable, when, as among the 

medieval nobility, marriage was merely a political or domestic 

treaty and could not, therefore, be a method of moral elevation. 

 

"Why is it," asked Retif de la Bretonne, towards the end of the 

eighteenth century, "that girls who have no morals are more 

seductive and more loveable than honest women? It is because, 

like the Greek courtesans to whom grace and voluptuousness were 

taught, they have studied the art of pleasing. Among the foolish 

detractors of my _Contemporaines_, not one guessed the 

philosophic aim of nearly everyone of these tales, which is to 

suggest to honest women the ways of making themselves loved. I 

should like to see the institution of initiations, such as those 

of the ancients.... To-day the happiness of the human species is 

abandoned to chance; all the experience of women is individual, 

like that of animals; it is lost with those women who, being 

naturally amiable, might have taught others to become so. 

Prostitutes alone make a superficial study of it, and the lessons 

they receive are, for the most part, as harmful as those of 

respectable Greek and Roman matrons were holy and honorable, only 

tending to wantonness, to the exhaustion alike of the purse and 

of the physical faculties, while the aim of the ancient matrons 

was the union of husband and wife and their mutual attachment 

through pleasure. The Christian religion annihilated the 

Mysteries as infamous, but we may regard that annihilation as one 


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