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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

a training in those arts which render a woman agreeable to a man and a man 

agreeable to a woman in the relationship of marriage, and it is often more 

or less dimly realized that courtship is not a mere preliminary to 

marriage, but a biologically essential part of the marriage relationship 

throughout. 

 

Sexual initiation is carried out very thoroughly in Azimba land, 

Central Africa. H. Crawford Angus, the first European to visit 

the Azimba people, lived among them for a year, and has described 

the Chensamwali, or initiation ceremony, of girls. "At the first 

sign of menstruation in a young girl, she is taught the mysteries 

of womanhood, and is shown the different positions for sexual 

intercourse. The vagina is handled freely, and if not previously 

enlarged (which may have taken place at the harvest festival when 

a boy and girl are allowed to 'keep house' during the day-time by 

themselves, and when quasi-intercourse takes place) it is now 

enlarged by means of a horn or corn-cob, which is inserted and 

secured in place by bands of bark cloth. When all signs [of 

menstruation] have passed, a public announcement of a dance is 

given to the women in the village. At this dance no men are 

allowed to be present, and it was only with a great deal of 

trouble that I managed to witness it. The girl to be 'danced' is 

led back from the bush to her mother's hut where she is kept in 

solitude to the morning of the dance. On that morning she is 

placed on the ground in a sitting position, while the dancers 

form a ring around her. Several songs are then sung with 

reference to the genital organs. The girl is then stripped and 

made to go through the mimic performance of sexual intercourse, 

and if the movements are not enacted properly, as is often the 

case when the girl is timid and bashful, one of the older women 

will take her place and show her how she is to perform. Many 

songs about the relation between men and women are sung, and the 

girl is instructed as to all her duties when she becomes a wife. 

She is also instructed that during the time of her menstruation 

she is unclean, and that during her monthly period she must close 

her vulva with a pad of fibre used for the purpose. The object of 

the dance is to inculcate to the girl the knowledge of married 

life. The girl is taught to be faithful to her husband and to try 

to bear children, and she is also taught the various arts and 

methods of making herself seductive and pleasing to her husband, 

and of thus retaining him in her power." (H. Crawford Angus, "The 

Chensamwali," _Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1898, Heft 6, p. 

479). 

 

In Abyssinia, as well as on the Zanzibar coast, according to 

Stecker (quoted by Ploss-Bartels, _Das Weib_, Section 119) young 

girls are educated in buttock movements which increase their 

charm in coitus. These movements, of a rotatory character, are 

called Duk-Duk. To be ignorant of Duk-Duk is a great disgrace to 

a girl. Among the Swahili women of Zanzibar, indeed, a complete 

artistic system of hip-movements is cultivated, to be displayed 

in coitus. It prevails more especially on the coast, and a 

Swahili woman is not counted a "lady" (bibi) unless she is 

acquainted with this art. From sixty to eighty young women 

practice this buttock dance together for some eight hours a day, 

laying aside all clothing, and singing the while. The public are 

not admitted. The dance, which is a kind of imitation of coitus, 


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