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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

The breath of Christian asceticism had passed over love; it was 

no longer, as in classic days, an art to be cultivated, but only 

a malady to be cured. The true inheritor of the classic spirit in 

this, as in many other matters, was not the Christian world, but 

the world of Islam. _The Perfumed Garden_ of the Sheik Nefzaoui 

was probably written in the city of Tunis early in the sixteenth 

century by an author who belonged to the south of Tunis. Its 

opening invocation clearly indicates that it departs widely from 

the conception of love as a disease: "Praise be to God who has 

placed man's greatest pleasures in the natural parts of woman, 

and has destined the natural parts of man to afford the greatest 

enjoyments to woman." The Arabic book, _El Ktab_, or "The Secret 

Laws of Love," is a modern work, by Omer Haleby Abu Othman, who 

was born in Algiers of a Moorish mother and a Turkish father. 

 

 

For Christianity the permission to yield to the sexual impulse at all was 

merely a concession to human weakness, an indulgence only possible when it 

was carefully hedged and guarded on every side. Almost from the first the 

Christians began to cultivate the art of virginity, and they could not so 

dislocate their point of view as to approve of the art of love. All their 

passionate adoration in the sphere of sex went out towards chastity. 

Possessed by such ideals, they could only tolerate human love at all by 

giving to one special form of it a religious sacramental character, and 

even that sacramental halo imparted to love a quasi-ascetic character 

which precluded the idea of regarding love as an art.[379] Love gained a 

religious element but it lost a moral element, since, outside 

Christianity, the art of love is part of the foundation of sexual 

morality, wherever such morality in any degree exists. In Christendom love 

in marriage was left to shift for itself as best it might; the art of love 

was a dubious art which was held to indicate a certain commerce with 

immorality and even indeed to be itself immoral. That feeling was 

doubtless strengthened by the fact that Ovid was the most conspicuous 

master in literature of the art of love. His literary reputation--far 

greater than it now seems to us[380]--gave distinction to his position as 

the author of the chief extant text-book of the art of love. With Humanism 

and the Renaissance and the consequent realization that Christianity had 

overlooked one side of life, Ovid's _Ars Amatoria_ was placed on a 

pedestal it had not occupied before or since. It represented a step 

forward in civilization; it revealed love not as a mere animal instinct or 

a mere pledged duty, but as a complex, humane, and refined relationship 

which demanded cultivation; "_arte regendus amor_." Boccaccio made a wise 

teacher put Ovid's _Ars Amatoria_ into the hands of the young. In an age 

still oppressed by the mediaeval spirit, it was a much needed text-book, 

but it possessed the fatal defect, as a text-book, of presenting the 

erotic claims of the individual as divorced from the claims of good social 

order. It never succeeded in establishing itself as a generally accepted 

manual of love, and in the eyes of many it served to stamp the subject it 

dealt with as one that lies outside the limits of good morals. 

 

When, however, we take a wider survey, and inquire into the discipline for 

life that is imparted to the young in many parts of the world, we shall 

frequently find that the art of love, understood in varying ways, is an 

essential part of that discipline. Summary, though generally adequate, as 

are the educational methods of primitive peoples, they not seldom include 


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