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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

aspects of civilization the Romans were willing to regard love as a 

permissible indulgence, but they were not, as a people, prepared to 

cultivate it as an art. Their poets do not, in this matter, represent the 

moral feeling of their best people. It is indeed a highly significant 

fact that Ovid, the most distinguished Latin poet who concerned himself 

much with the art of love, associated that art not so much with morality 

as with immorality. As he viewed it, the art of love was less the art of 

retaining a woman in her home than the art of winning her away from it; it 

was the adulterer's art rather than the husband's art. Such a conception 

would be impossible out of Europe, but it proved very favorable to the 

growth of the Christian attitude towards the art of love. 

 

Love as an art, as well as a passion, seems to have received 

considerable study in antiquity, though the results of that study 

have perished. Cadmus Milesius, says Suidas, wrote fourteen great 

volumes on the passion of love, but they are not now to be found. 

Rohde (_Das Griechische Roman_, p. 55) has a brief section on the 

Greek philosophic writers on love. Bloch (_Beitraege zur 

Psychopathia Sexualis_, Teil I, p. 191) enumerates the ancient 

women writers who dealt with the art of love. Montaigne 

(_Essais_, liv. ii, Ch. V) gives a list of ancient classical lost 

books on love. Burton (_Anatomy of Melancholy_, Bell's edition, 

vol. iii, p. 2) also gives a list of lost books on love. Burton 

himself dealt at length with the manifold signs of love and its 

grievous symptoms. Boissier de Sauvages, early in the eighteenth 

century, published a Latin thesis, _De Amore_, discussing love 

somewhat in the same spirit as Burton, as a psychic disease to be 

treated and cured. 

 

 


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