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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

a Lasco, the Catholic Bishop who became a Protestant and settled 

in England during Edward VI's reign, was following many mediaeval 

theologians when he recognized the _sacramentum solationis_, in 

addition to _proles_, as an element of marriage. Cranmer, in his 

marriage service of 1549, stated that "mutual help and comfort," 

as well as procreation, enter into the object of marriage 

(Wickham Legg, _Ecclesiological Essays_, p. 204; Howard, 

_Matrimonial Institutions_, vol. i, p. 398). Modern theologians 

speak still more distinctly. "The sexual act," says Northcote 

(_Christianity and Sex Problems_, p. 55), "is a love act. Duly 

regulated, it conduces to the ethical welfare of the individual 

and promotes his efficiency as a social unit. The act itself and 

its surrounding emotions stimulate within the organism the 

powerful movements of a vast psychic life." At an earlier period 

also, Schleiermacher, in his _Letters on Lucinde_, had pointed 

out the great significance of love for the spiritual development 

of the individual. 

 

Edward Carpenter truly remarks, in _Love's Coming of Age_, that 

sexual love is not only needed for physical creation, but also 

for spiritual creation. Bloch, again, in discussing this question 

(_The Sexual Life of Our Time_, Ch. VI) concludes that "love and 

the sexual embrace have not only an end in procreation, they 

constitute an end in themselves, and are necessary for the life, 

development, and inner growth of the individual himself." 

 

It is argued by some, who admit mutual love as a constituent part of 

marriage, that such love, once recognized at the outset, may be taken for 

granted, and requires no further discussion; there is, they believe, no 

art of love to be either learnt or taught; it comes by nature. Nothing 

could be further from the truth, most of all as regards civilized man. 

Even the elementary fact of coitus needs to be taught. No one could take a 

more austerely Puritanic view of sexual affairs than Sir James Paget, and 

yet Paget (in his lecture on "Sexual Hypochondriasis") declared that 

"Ignorance about sexual affairs seems to be a notable characteristic of 

the more civilized part of the human race. Among ourselves it is certain 

that the method of copulating needs to be taught, and that they to whom it 

is not taught remain quite ignorant about it." Gallard, again, remarks 

similarly (in his _Clinique des Maladies des Femmes_) that young people, 

like Daphnis in Longus's pastoral, need a beautiful Lycenion to give them 

a solid education, practical as well as theoretical, in these matters, and 

he considers that mothers should instruct their daughters at marriage, and 

fathers their sons. Philosophers have from time to time recognized the 

gravity of these questions and have discoursed concerning them; thus 

Epicurus, as Plutarch tells us,[375] would discuss with his disciples 

various sexual matters, such as the proper time for coitus; but then, as 

now, there were obscurantists who would leave even the central facts of 

life to the hazards of chance or ignorance, and these presumed to blame 

the philosopher. 

 

There is, however, much more to be learnt in these matters than the mere 

elementary facts of sexual intercourse. The art of love certainly includes 

such primary facts of sexual hygiene, but it involves also the whole 

erotic discipline of marriage, and that is why its significance is so 

great, for the welfare and happiness of the individual, for the stability 

of sexual unions, and indirectly for the race, since the art of love is 


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