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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

procreation, and to regard the relationship of marriage as 

exclusively lying in the relationship of the two parties to each 

other. Apart from the fact, which it is unnecessary again to call 

attention to, that, from the public and social point of view, a 

marriage without children, however important to the two persons 

concerned, is a relationship without any public significance, it 

must further be said that, in the absence of children, even the 

personal erotic life itself is apt to suffer, for in the normal 

erotic life, especially in women, sexual love tends to grow into 

parental love. Moreover, the full development of mutual love and 

dependence is with difficulty attained, and there is absence of 

that closest of bonds, the mutual cooeperation of two persons in 

producing a new person. The perfect and complete marriage in its 

full development is a trinity. 

 

Those who seek to eliminate the erotic factor from marriage as 

unessential, or at all events as only permissible when strictly 

subordinated to the end of procreation, have made themselves 

heard from time to time at various periods. Even the ancients, 

Greeks and Romans alike, in their more severe moments advocated 

the elimination of the erotic element from marriage, and its 

confinement to extra-marital relationships, that is so far as men 

were concerned; for the erotic needs of married women they had no 

provision to make. Montaigne, soaked in classic traditions, has 

admirably set forth the reasons for eliminating the erotic 

interest from marriage: "One does not marry for oneself, whatever 

may be said; a man marries as much, or more, for his posterity, 

for his family; the usage and interest of marriage touch our race 

beyond ourselves.... Thus it is a kind of incest to employ, in 

this venerable and sacred parentage, the efforts and the 

extravagances of amorous license" (_Essais_, Bk. i, Ch. XXIX; Bk. 

iii, Ch. V). This point of view easily commended itself to the 

early Christians, who, however, deliberately overlooked its 

reverse side, the establishment of erotic interests outside 

marriage. "To have intercourse except for procreation," said 

Clement of Alexandria (_Paedagogus_, Bk. ii, Ch. X), "is to do 

injury to Nature." While, however, that statement is quite true 

of the lower animals, it is not true of man, and especially not 

true of civilized man, whose erotic needs are far more developed, 

and far more intimately associated with the finest and highest 

part of the organism, than is the case among animals generally. 

For the animal, sexual desire, except when called forth by the 

conditions involved by procreative necessities, has no existence. 

It is far otherwise in man, for whom, even when the question of 

procreation is altogether excluded, sexual love is still an 

insistent need, and even a condition of the finest spiritual 

development. The Catholic Church, therefore, while regarding with 

admiration a continence in marriage which excluded sexual 

relations except for the end of procreation, has followed St. 

Augustine in treating intercourse apart from procreation with 

considerable indulgence, as only a venial sin. Here, however, the 

Church was inclined to draw the line, and it appears that in 1679 

Innocent XI condemned the proposition that "the conjugal act, 

practiced for pleasure alone, is exempt even from venial sin." 

 

Protestant theologians have been inclined to go further, and 

therein they found some authority even in Catholic writers. John 


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