Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

CHAPTER XI. 

 

THE ART OF LOVE. 

 

Marriage Not Only for Procreation--Theologians on the _Sacramentum 

Solationis_--Importance of the _Art of Love_--The Basis of Stability in 

Marriage and the Condition for Right Procreation--The Art of Love the 

Bulwark Against Divorce--The Unity of Love and Marriage a Principle of 

Modern Morality--Christianity and the Art of Love--Ovid--The Art of Love 

Among Primitive Peoples--Sexual Initiation in Africa and Elsewhere--The 

Tendency to Spontaneous Development of the Art of Love in Early 

Life--Flirtation--Sexual Ignorance in Women--The Husband's Place in Sexual 

Initiation--Sexual Ignorance in Men--The Husband's Education for 

Marriage--The Injury Done by the Ignorance of Husbands--The Physical and 

Mental Results of Unskilful Coitus--Women Understand the Art of Love 

Better Than Men--Ancient and Modern Opinions Concerning Frequency of 

Coitus--Variation in Sexual Capacity--The Sexual Appetite--The Art of Love 

Based on the Biological Facts of Courtship--The Art of Pleasing Women--The 

Lover Compared to the Musician--The Proposal as a Part of 

Courtship--Divination in the Art of Love--The Importance of the 

Preliminaries in Courtship--The Unskilful Husband Frequently the Cause of 

the Frigid Wife--The Difficulty of Courtship--Simultaneous Orgasm--The 

Evils of Incomplete Gratification in Women--Coitus Interruptus--Coitus 

Reservatus--The Human Method of Coitus--Variations in Coitus--Posture in 

Coitus--The Best Time for Coitus--The Influence of Coitus in Marriage--The 

Advantages of Absence in Marriage--The Risks of Absence--Jealousy--The 

Primitive Function of Jealousy--Its Predominance Among Animals, Savages, 

etc., and in Pathological States--An Anti-Social Emotion--Jealousy 

Incompatible with the Progress of Civilization--The Possibility of Loving 

More Than One Person at a Time--Platonic Friendship--The Conditions Which 

Make It Possible--The Maternal Element in Woman's Love--The Final 

Development of Conjugal Love--The Problem of Love One of the Greatest of 

Social Questions. 

 

 

It will be clear from the preceding discussion that there are two elements 

in every marriage so far as that marriage is complete. On the one hand 

marriage is a union prompted by mutual love and only sustainable as a 

reality, apart from its mere formal side, by the cultivation of such love. 

On the other hand marriage is a method for propagating the race and 

having its end in offspring. In the first aspect its aim is erotic, in the 

second parental. Both these ends have long been generally recognized. We 

find them set forth, for instance, in the marriage service of the Church 

of England, where it is stated that marriage exists both for "the mutual 

society, help and comfort that the one ought to have of the other," and 

also for "the procreation of children." Without the factor of mutual love 

the proper conditions for procreation cannot exist; without the factor of 

procreation the sexual union, however beautiful and sacred a relationship 

it may in itself be, remains, in essence, a private relationship, 

incomplete as a marriage and without public significance. It becomes 

necessary, therefore, to supplement the preceding discussion of marriage 

in its general outlines by a final and more intimate consideration of 

marriage in its essence, as embracing the art of love and the science of 

procreation. 

 

There has already been occasion from time to time to refer to 

those who, starting from various points of view, have sought to 

limit the scope of marriage and to suppress one or other of its 

elements. (See e.g., _ante_, p. 135.) 

 

In modern times the tendency has been to exclude the factor of 


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