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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

"The struggle against syphilis is only possible if we agree to regard its 

victims as unfortunate and not as guilty.... We must give up the prejudice 

which has led to the creation of the term 'shameful diseases,' and which 

commands silence concerning this scourge of the family and of humanity." 

In these words of Duclaux, the distinguished successor of Pasteur at the 

Pasteur Institute, in his noble and admirable work _L'Hygiene Sociale_, we 

have indicated to us, I am convinced, the only road by which we can 

approach the rational and successful treatment of the great social problem 

of venereal disease. 

 

 

The supreme importance of this key to the solution of a problem 

which has often seemed insoluble is to-day beginning to become 

recognized in all quarters, and in every country. Thus a 

distinguished German authority, Professor Finger (_Geschlecht und 

Gesellschaft_, Bd. i, Heft 5) declares that venereal disease must 

not be regarded as the well-merited punishment for a debauched 

life, but as an unhappy accident. It seems to be in France, 

however, that this truth has been proclaimed with most courage 

and humanity, and not alone by the followers of science and 

medicine, but by many who might well be excused from interfering 

with so difficult and ungrateful a task. Thus the brothers, Paul 

and Victor Margueritte, who occupy a brilliant and honorable 

place in contemporary French letters, have distinguished 

themselves by advocating a more humane attitude towards 

prostitutes, and a more modern method of dealing with the 

question of venereal disease. "The true method of prevention is 

that which makes it clear to all that syphilis is not a 

mysterious and terrible thing, the penalty of the sin of the 

flesh, a sort of shameful evil branded by Catholic malediction, 

but an ordinary disease which may be treated and cured." It may 

be remarked that the aversion to acknowledge venereal disease is 

at least as marked in France as in any other country; "maladies 

honteuses" is a consecrated French term, just as "loathsome 

disease" is in English; "in the hospital," says Landret, "it 

requires much trouble to obtain an avowal of gonorrhoea, 

and we may esteem ourselves happy if the patient acknowledges the 

fact of having had syphilis." 

 

 

No evils can be combated until they are recognized, simply and frankly, 

and honestly discussed. It is a significant and even symbolic fact that 

the bacteria of disease rarely flourish when they are open to the free 

currents of pure air. Obscurity, disguise, concealment furnish the best 

conditions for their vigor and diffusion, and these favoring conditions we 

have for centuries past accorded to venereal diseases. It was not always 

so, as indeed the survival of the word 'venereal' itself in this 

connection, with its reference to a goddess, alone suffices to show. Even 

the name "syphilis" itself, taken from a romantic poem in which 

Fracastorus sought a mythological origin for the disease, bears witness to 

the same fact. The romantic attitude is indeed as much out of date as that 

of hypocritical and shamefaced obscurantism. We need to face these 

diseases in the same simple, direct, and courageous way which has already 

been adopted successfully in the ease of smallpox, a disease which, of 

old, men thought analogous to syphilis and which was indeed once almost as 

terrible in its ravages. 

 

At this point, however, we encounter those who say that it is unnecessary 

to show any sort of recognition of venereal diseases, and immoral to do 

anything that might seem to involve indulgence to those who suffer from 


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