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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

confined to the smaller part of the people, the vast majority being 

monogamous." Maurice Gregory (_Contemporary Review_, Sept., 1906) gives 

statistics showing that nearly everywhere the tendency is towards equality 

in number of the sexes. 

 

[373] In a polygamous land a man is of course as much bound by his 

obligations to his second wife as to his first. Among ourselves the man's 

"second wife" is degraded with the name of "mistress," and the worse he 

treats her and her children the more his "morality" is approved, just as 

the Catholic Church, when struggling to establish sacerdotal celibacy, 

approved more highly the priest who had illegitimate relations with women 

than the priest who decently and openly married. If his neglect induces a 

married man's mistress to make known her relationship to him the man is 

justified in prosecuting her, and his counsel, assured of general 

sympathy, will state in court that "this woman has even been so wicked as 

to write to the prosecutor's wife!" 

 

[374] Howard, in his judicial _History of Matrimonial Institutions_ (vol. 

ii. pp. 96 et seq.), cannot refrain from drawing attention to the almost 

insanely wild character of the language used in England not so many years 

ago by those who opposed marriage with a deceased wife's sister, and he 

contrasts it with the much more reasonable attitude of the Catholic 

Church. "Pictures have been drawn," he remarks, "of the moral anarchy such 

marriages must produce, which are read by American, Colonial, and 

Continental observers with a bewilderment that is not unmixed with 

disgust, and are, indeed, a curious illustration of the extreme insularity 

of the English mind." So recently as A.D. 1908 a bill was brought into the 

British House of Lords proposing that desertion without cause for two 

years shall be a ground for divorce, a reasonable and humane measure which 

is law in most parts of the civilized world. The Lord Chancellor (Lord 

Loreburn), a Liberal, and in the sphere of politics an enlightened and 

sagacious leader, declared that such a proposal was "absolutely 

impossible." The House rejected the proposal by 61 votes to 2. Even the 

marriage decrees of the Council of Trent were not affirmed by such an 

overwhelming majority. In matters of marriage legislation England has 

scarcely yet emerged from the Middle Ages. 

 


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