Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

position of women. 

 

[348] In an important article, with illustrative cases, on "The 

Neuro-psychical Element in Conjugal Aversion" (_Journal of Nervous and 

Mental Diseases_, Sept., 1892) Smith Baker refers to the cases in which "a 

man may find himself progressively becoming antipathetic, through 

recognition of the comparatively less developed personality of the one to 

whom he happens to be married. Marrying, perhaps, before he has learned to 

accurately judge of character and its tendencies, he awakens to the fact 

that he is honorably bound to live all his physiological life with, not a 

real companion, but a mere counterfeit." The cases are still more 

numerous, the same writer observes, in which the sexual appetite of the 

wife fails to reveal itself except as the result of education and 

practice. "This sort of natural-unnatural condition is the source of much 

disappointment, and of intense suffering on the part of the woman as well 

as of family dissatisfaction." Yet such causes for divorce are far too 

complex to be stated in statute-books, and far too intimate to be pleaded 

in courts of justice. 

 

[349] Ten years ago, if not still, the United States came fourth in order 

of frequency of divorce, after Japan, Denmark, and Switzerland. 

 

[350] Lecky, the historian of European morals, has pointed out (_Democracy 

and Liberty_, vol. ii, p. 172) the close connection generally between 

facility of divorce and a high standard of sexual morality. 

 

[351] So, e.g., Hobhouse, _Morals in Evolution_, vol. i, p. 237. 

 

[352] In England this step was taken in the reign of Henry VII, when the 

forcible marriage of women against their will was forbidden by statute (3 

Henry VII, c. 2). Even in the middle of the seventeenth century, however, 

the question of forcible marriage had again to be dealt with (_Inderwick_, 

Interregnum, pp. 40 et seq.). 

 

[353] Woods Hutchinson (_Contemporary Review_, Sept., 1905) argues that 

when there is epilepsy, insanity, moral perversion, habitual drunkenness, 

or criminal conduct of any kind, divorce, for the sake of the next 

generation, should be not permissive but compulsory. Mere divorce, 

however, would not suffice to attain the ends desired. 

 

[354] Similarly in Germany, Wanda von Sacher-Masoch, who had suffered much 

from marriage, whatever her own defects of character may have been, writes 

at the end of _Meine Lebensbeichte_ that "as long as women have not the 

courage to regulate, without State-interference or Church-interference, 

relationships which concern themselves alone, they will not be free." In 

place of this old decayed system of marriage so opposed to our modern 

thoughts and feelings, she would have private contracts made by a lawyer. 

In England, at a much earlier period, Charles Kingsley, who was an ardent 

friend to women's movements, and whose feeling for womanhood amounted 

almost to worship, wrote to J.S. Mill: "There will never be a good world 

for women until the last remnant of the Canon law is civilized off the 

earth." 

 

[355] "No fouler institution was ever invented," declared Auberon Herbert 

many years ago, expressing, before its time, a feeling which has since 

become more common; "and its existence drags on, to our deep shame, 

because we have not the courage frankly to say that the sexual relations 

of husband and wife, or those who live together, concern their own selves, 

and do not concern the prying, gloating, self-righteous, and intensely 

untruthful world outside." 

 

[356] Hobhouse, op. cit. vol. i, p. 237. 

 

[357] The same conception of marriage as a contract still persists to some 

extent also in the United States, whither it was carried by the early 


Page 4 from 6:  Back   1   2   3  [4]  5   6   Forward