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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

with the spirit of Puritanism which insists that in the things that 

concern the individual alone the individual himself shall be the supreme 

judge. That doctrine as applied to marriage was in England magnificently 

asserted by the genius of Milton, and in America it has been a leaven 

which is still working in marriage legislation towards an inevitable goal 

which is scarcely yet in sight. The marriage system of the future, as it 

moves along its present course, will resemble the old Christian system in 

that it will recognize the sacred and sacramental character of the sexual 

relationship, and it will resemble the civil conception in that it will 

insist that marriage, so far as it involves procreation, shall be publicly 

registered by the State. But in opposition to the Church it will recognize 

that marriage, in so far as it is purely a sexual relationship, is a 

private matter the conditions of which must be left to the persons who 

alone are concerned in it; and in opposition to the civil theory it will 

recognize that marriage is in its essence a fact and not a contract, 

though it may give rise to contracts, so long as such contracts do not 

touch that essential fact. And in one respect it will go beyond either the 

ecclesiastical conception or the civil conception. Man has in recent times 

gained control of his own procreative powers, and that control involves a 

shifting of the centre of gravity of marriage, in so far as marriage is an 

affair of the State, from the vagina to the child which is the fruit of 

the womb. Marriage as a state institution will centre, not around the 

sexual relationship, but around the child which is the outcome of that 

relationship. In so far as marriage is an inviolable public contract it 

will be of such a nature that it will be capable of automatically covering 

with its protection every child that is born into the world, so that every 

child may possess a legal mother and a legal father. On the one side, 

therefore, marriage is tending to become less stringent; on the other side 

it is tending to become more stringent. On the personal side it is a 

sacred and intimate relationship with which the State has no concern; on 

the social side it is the assumption of the responsible public sponsorship 

of a new member of the State. Some among us are working to further one of 

these aspects of marriage, some to further the other aspect. Both are 

indispensable to establish a perfect harmony. It is necessary to hold the 

two aspects of marriage apart, in order to do equal justice to the 

individual and to society, but in so far as marriage approaches its ideal 

state those two aspects become one. 

 

We have now completed the discussion of marriage as it presents itself to 

the modern man born in what in mediaeval days was called Christendom. It is 

not an easy subject to discuss. It is indeed a very difficult subject, and 

only after many years is it possible to detect the main drift of its 

apparently opposing and confused currents when one is oneself in the midst 

of them. To an Englishman it is, perhaps, peculiarly difficult, for the 

Englishman is nothing if not insular; in that fact lie whatever virtues he 

possesses, as well as their reverse sides.[374] 

 

Yet it is worth while to attempt to climb to a height from which we can 

view the stream of social tendency in its true proportions and estimate 

its direction. It is necessary to do so if we value our mental peace in an 

age when men's minds are agitated by many petty movements which have 

nothing to do with their great temporal interests, to say nothing of their 

eternal interests. When we have attained a wide vision of the solid 


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