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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

permission of the infirm one, may marry again, but the infirm one 

is not allowed to marry again during the other's life. Impotency 

at the time of marriage, of course, made the marriage void 

without the intervention of any ecclesiastical law. But Aquinas, 

and later theologians, allow that an excessive disgust for a wife 

justifies a man in regarding himself as impotent in relation to 

her. These rules are, of course, quite distinct from the 

permissions to break the marriage laws granted to kings and 

princes; such permissions do not count as evidence of the 

Church's rules, for, as the Council of Constantinople prudently 

decided in 809, "Divine law can do nothing against Kings" (art. 

"Bigamy," _Dictionary of Christian Antiquities_). The law of 

monogamy was also relaxed in cases of enforced or voluntary 

desertion. Thus the Council of Vermerie (752) enacted that if a 

wife will not accompany her husband when he is compelled to 

follow his lord into another land, he may marry again, provided 

he sees no hope of returning. Theodore of Canterbury (688), 

again, pronounces that if a wife is carried away by the enemy and 

her husband cannot redeem her, he may marry again after an 

interval of a year, or, if there is a chance of redeeming her, 

after an interval of five years; the wife may do the same. Such 

rules, though not general, show, as Meyrick points out (art. 

"Marriage," _Dictionary of Christian Antiquities_), a willingness 

"to meet particular cases as they arise." 

 


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