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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

population. None of the couples thus separated--and never 

disciplined to celibacy as are the Catholic clergy of to-day--may 

marry again; we, in effect, bid the more scrupulous among them to 

become celibates, and to the less scrupulous we grant permission 

to do as they like. This process is carried on by virtue of the 

collective inertia of the community, and when it is supported by 

arguments, if that ever happens, they are of an antiquarian 

character which can only call forth a pitying smile. 

 

It may be added that there is a further reason why the custom of 

branding sexual variations from the norm as "immoral" is not so 

harmless as some affect to believe: such variations appear to be 

not uncommon among men and women of superlative ability whose 

powers are needed unimpeded in the service of mankind. To attempt 

to fit such persons into the narrow moulds which suit the 

majority is not only an injustice to them as individuals, but it 

is an offence against society, which may fairly claim that its 

best members shall not be hampered in its service. The notion 

that the person whose sexual needs differ from those of the 

average is necessarily a socially bad person, is a notion 

unsupported by facts. Every case must be judged on its own 

merits. 

 

Undoubtedly the most common variation from normal monogamy has in all 

stages of human culture been polygyny or the sexual union of one man with 

more than one woman. It has sometimes been socially and legally 

recognized, and sometimes unrecognized, but in either case it has not 

failed to occur. Polyandry, or the union of a woman with more than one 

man, has been comparatively rare and for intelligible reasons: men have 

most usually been in a better position, economically and legally, to 

organize a household with themselves as the centre; a woman is, unlike a 

man, by nature and often by custom unfitted for intercourse for 

considerable periods at a time; a woman, moreover, has her thoughts and 

affections more concentrated on her children. Apart from this the 

biological masculine traditions point to polygyny much more than the 

feminine traditions point to polyandry. Although it is true that a woman 

can undergo a much greater amount of sexual intercourse than a man, it 

also remains true that the phenomena of courtship in nature have made it 

the duty of the male to be alert in offering his sexual attention to the 

female, whose part it has been to suspend her choice coyly until she is 

sure of her preference. Polygynic conditions have also proved 

advantageous, as they have permitted the most vigorous and successful 

members of a community to have the largest number of mates and so to 

transmit their own superior qualities. 

 

"Polygamy," writes Woods Hutchinson (_Contemporary Review_, Oct., 

1904), though he recognizes the advantages of monogamy, "as a 

racial institution, among animals as among men, has many solid 

and weighty considerations in its favor, and has resulted in 

both human and pre-human times, in the production of a very high 

type of both individual and social development." He points out 

that it promotes intelligence, cooeperation, and division of 

labor, while the keen competition for women weeds out the weaker 

and less attractive males. 

 

Among our European ancestors, alike among Germans and Celts, 

polygyny and other sexual forms existed as occasional variations. 

Tacitus noted polygyny in Germany, and Caesar found in Britain 

that brothers would hold their wives in common, the children 


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