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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

had a free union constituted by simple declaration before a 

magistrate and conferring almost the same family rights as 

ordinary marriage." This wish has been widely echoed. 

 

In China, although polygamy in the strict sense cannot properly 

be said to exist, the interests of the child, the woman, and the 

State are alike safeguarded by enabling a man to enter into a 

kind of secondary marriage with the mother of his child. "Thanks 

to this system," Paul d'Enjoy states (_La Revue_, Sept., 1905), 

"which allows the husband to marry the woman he desires, without 

being prevented by previous and undissolved unions, it is only 

right to remark that there are no seduced and abandoned girls, 

except such as no law could save from what is really innate 

depravity; and that there are no illegitimate children except 

those whose mothers are unhappily nearer to animals by their 

senses than to human beings by their reason and dignity." 

 

The new civil code of Japan, which is in many respects so 

advanced, allows an illegitimate child to be "recognized" by 

giving notice to the registrar; when a married man so recognizes 

a child, it appears, the child may be adopted by the wife as her 

own, though not actually rendered legitimate. This state of 

things represents a transition stage; it can scarcely be said to 

recognize the rights of the "recognized" child's mother. Japan, 

it may be added, has adopted the principle of the automatic 

legitimation by marriage of the children born to the couple 

before marriage. 

 

In Australia, where women possess a larger share than elsewhere 

in making and administering the laws, some attention is beginning 

to be given to the rights of illegitimate children. Thus in South 

Australia, paternity may be proved before birth, and the father 

(by magistrate's order) provides lodging for one month before and 

after birth, as well as nurse, doctor, and clothing, furnishing 

security that he will do so; after birth, at the magistrate's 

decision, he pays a weekly sum for the child's maintenance. An 

"illegitimate" mother may also be kept in a public institution at 

the public expense for six months to enable her to become 

attached to her child. 

 

Such provisions are developed from the widely recognized right of 

the unmarried woman to claim support for her child from its 

father. In France, indeed, and in the legal codes which follow 

the French example, it is not legally permitted to inquire into 

the paternity of an illegitimate child. Such a law is, needless 

to say, alike unjust to the mother, to the child, and to the 

State. In Austria, the law goes to the opposite, though certainly 

more reasonable, extreme, and permits even the mother who has had 

several lovers to select for herself which she chooses to make 

responsible for her child. The German code adopts an intermediate 

course, and comes only to the aid of the unmarried mother who has 

one lover. In all such cases, however, the aid given is 

pecuniary only; it insures the mother no recognition or respect, 

and (as Wahrmund has truly said in his _Ehe und Eherecht_) it is 

still necessary to insist on "the unconditional sanctity of 

motherhood, which is entitled, under whatever circumstances it 

arises, to the respect and protection of society." 

 

It must be added that, from the social point of view, it is not 

the sexual union which requires legal recognition, but the child 

which is the product of that union. It would, moreover, be 


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