Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

marriage, and that centre is now being gradually transferred to the child. 

If we turn from the Canonists to the writings of a modern like Ellen Key, 

who so accurately represents much that is most characteristic and 

essential in the late tendencies of marriage development, we seem to have 

entered a new world, even a newly illuminated world. For "in the new 

sexual morality, as in Corregio's _Notte_, the light emanates from the 

child."[369] 

 

No doubt this change is largely a matter of sentiment, of, as we sometimes 

say, mere sentiment, although there is nothing so powerful in human 

affairs as sentiment, and the revolution effected by Jesus, the later 

revolution effected by Rousseau, were mainly revolutions in sentiment. But 

the change is also a matter of the growing recognition of interests and 

rights, and as such it manifests itself in law. We can scarcely doubt that 

we are approaching a time when it will be generally understood that the 

entrance into the world of every child, without exception, should be 

preceded by the formation of a marriage contract which, while in no way 

binding the father and mother to any duties, or any privileges, towards 

each other, binds them both towards their child and at the same time 

ensures their responsibility towards the State. It is impossible for the 

State to obtain more than this, but it should be impossible for it to 

demand less. A contract of such a kind "marries" the father and mother so 

far as the parentage of the individual child is concerned, and in no other 

respect; it is a contract which leaves entirely unaffected their past, 

present, or future relations towards other persons, otherwise it would be 

impossible to enforce it. In all parts of the world this elementary demand 

of social morality is slowly beginning to be recognized, and as it affects 

hundreds of thousands of infants[370] who are yearly branded as 

"illegitimate" through no act of their own, no one can say that the 

recognition has come too soon. As yet, indeed, it seems nowhere to be 

complete. 

 

Most attempts or proposals for the avoidance of illegitimate 

births are concerned with the legalizing of unions of a less 

binding degree than the present legal marriage. Such unions would 

serve to counteract other evils. Thus an English writer, who has 

devoted much study to sex questions, writes in a private letter: 

"The best remedy for the licentiousness of celibate men and the 

mental and physical troubles of continence in woman would be 

found in a recognized honorable system of free unions and 

trial-marriages, in which preventive intercourse is practiced 

until the lovers were old enough to become parents, and possessed 

of sufficient means to support a family. The prospect of a 

loveless existence for young men and women of ardent natures is 

intolerable and as terrible as the prospect of painful illness 

and death. But I think the old order must change ere long." 

 

In Teutonic countries there is a strongly marked current of 

feeling in the direction of establishing legal unions of a lower 

degree than marriage. They exist in Sweden, as also in Norway 

where by a recent law the illegitimate child is entitled to the 

same rights in relation to both parents as the legitimate child, 

bearing the father's name and inheriting his property (_Die Neue 

Generation_, July, 1909, p. 303). In France the well-known judge, 

Magnard, so honorably distinguished for his attitude towards 

cases of infanticide by young mothers, has said: "I heartily wish 

that alongside the institution of marriage as it now exists we 


Page 2 from 5:  Back   1  [2]  3   4   5   Forward