Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

their wives with the same comradeship as the French treat their 

wives, nor seek their advice with the same reliance; the American 

woman is placed on an unreal pedestal. Yet another American 

writer, Rafford Pyke ("Husbands and Wives," _Cosmopolitan_, 

1902), points out that only a small proportion of American 

marriages are really unhappy, these being chiefly among the more 

cultured classes, in which the movement of expansion in women's 

interests and lives is taking place; it is more often the wife 

than the husband who is disappointed in marriage, and this is 

largely due to her inability to merge, not necessarily 

subordinate, her individuality in an equal union with his. 

"Marriage to-day is becoming more and more dependent for its 

success upon the adjustment of conditions that are psychical. 

Whereas in former generations it was sufficient that the union 

should involve physical reciprocity, in this age of ours the 

union must involve a psychic reciprocity as well. And whereas, 

heretofore, the community of interest was attained with ease, it 

is now becoming far more difficult because of the tendency to 

discourage a woman who marries from merging her separate 

individuality in her husband's. Yet, unless she does this, how 

can she have a complete and perfect interest in the life 

together, and, for that matter, how can he have such an interest 

either?" 

 

 

 

Professor Muensterberg, the distinguished psychologist, in his 

frank but appreciative study of American institutions, _The 

Americans_, taking a broader outlook, points out that the 

influence of women on morals in America has not been in every 

respect satisfactory, in so far as it has tended to encourage 

shallowness and superficiality. "The American woman who has 

scarcely a shred of education," he remarks (p. 587), "looks in 

vain for any subject on which she has not firm convictions 

already at hand.... The arrogance of this feminine lack of 

knowledge is the symptom of a profound trait in the feminine 

soul, and points to dangers springing from the domination of 

women in the intellectual life.... And in no other civilized land 

are ethical conceptions so worm-eaten by superstitions." 


Page 5 from 5:  Back   1   2   3   4  [5]