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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

the significance of personal constraint in the relationship of marriage. 

Everyone is probably familiar with cases in which a couple will live 

together through long years without entering the legal bond of marriage, 

notwithstanding difficulties in their mutual relationship which would have 

long since caused a separation or a divorce had they been legally married. 

When the inherent difficulties of the marital relationship are complicated 

by the difficulties due to external constraint, the development of 

individual moral responsibility cuts two ways, and leads to results that 

are not entirely satisfactory. This has been seen in the United States of 

America and attention has often been called to it by thoughtful American 

observers. It is, naturally, noted especially in women because it is in 

women that the new growth of personal freedom and moral responsibility has 

chiefly made itself felt. The first stirring of these new impulses, 

especially when associated, as it often is, with inexperience and 

ignorance, leads to impatience with the natural order, to a demand for 

impossible conditions of existence, and to an inaptitude not only for the 

arbitrary bondage of law but even for the wholesome and necessary bonds of 

human social life. It is always a hard lesson for the young and idealistic 

that in order to command Nature we must obey her; it can only be learnt 

through contact with life and by the attainment of full human growth. 

 

Dr. Felix Adler (in an address before the Society of Ethical 

Culture of New York, Nov. 17, 1889) called attention to what he 

regarded as the most deep-rooted cause of an undue prevalence of 

divorce in America. "The false idea of individual liberty is 

largely held in America," and when applied to family life it 

often leads to an impatience with these duties which the 

individual is either born into or has voluntarily accepted. "I am 

constrained to think that the prevalence of divorce is to be 

ascribed in no small degree to the influence of democratic 

ideas--that is, of false democratic ideas--and our hope lies in 

advancing towards a higher and truer democracy." A more recent 

American writer, this time a woman, Anna A. Rogers ("Why American 

Marriages Fail," _Atlantic Monthly_, Sept., 1907) speaks in the 

same sense, though perhaps in too unqualified a manner. She 

states that the frequency of divorce in America is due to three 

causes: (1) woman's failure to realize that marriage is her work 

in the world; (2) her growing individualism; (3) her lost art of 

giving, replaced by a highly developed receptive faculty. The 

American woman, this writer states, in discovering her own 

individuality has not yet learnt how to manage it; it is still 

"largely a useless, uneasy factor, vouchsafing her very little 

more peace than it does those in her immediate surcharged 

vicinity." Her circumstances tend to make of her "a curious 

anomalous hybrid; a cross between a magnificent, rather 

unmannerly boy, and a spoiled, exacting _demi-mondaine_, who 

sincerely loves in this world herself alone." She has not yet 

learnt that woman's supreme work in the world can only be 

attained through the voluntary acceptance of the restraints of 

marriage. The same writer points out that the fault is not alone 

with American women, but also with American men. Their idolatry 

of their women is largely responsible for that intolerance and 

selfishness which causes so many divorces; "American women are, 

as a whole, pampered and worshipped out of all reason." But the 

men, who lend themselves to this, do not feel that they can treat 


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