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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

really furnish without trouble a fairly satisfactory appearance 

of decorum; they are a real protection against various accidents. 

But the price at which they furnish these advantages is serious, 

and the advantages themselves only exist under unnatural 

conditions. The corset cramps the form and the healthy 

development of the organs; it enfeebles the voluntary muscular 

system; it is incompatible with perfect grace and beauty; it 

diminishes the sum of active energy. It exerts, in short, the 

same kind of influence on physical responsibility as formal 

marriage on moral responsibility. 

 

It is too often forgotten, and must therefore be repeated, that 

married people do not remain together because of any religious or 

legal tie; that tie is merely the historical outcome of their 

natural tendency to remain together, a tendency which is itself 

far older than history. "Love would exist in the world to-day, 

just as pure and just as enduring," says Shufeldt (_Medico-Legal 

Journal_, Dec., 1897), "had man never invented 'marriage.' Truly 

affined mates would have remained faithful to each other as long 

as life lasted. It is only when men attempt to improve upon 

nature that crime, disease, and unhappiness step in." "The 

abolition of marriage in the form now practiced," wrote Godwin 

more than a century ago (_Political Justice_, second edition, 

1796, vol. i, p. 248), "will be attended with no evils. We are 

apt to represent it to ourselves as the harbinger of brutal lust 

and depravity. But it really happens in this, as in other cases, 

that the positive laws which are made to restrain our vices 

irritate and multiply them." And Professor Lester Ward, in 

insisting on the strength of the monogamic sentiment in modern 

society, truly remarks (_International Journal of Ethics_, Oct., 

1896) that the rebellion against rigid marriage bonds "is, in 

reality, due to the very strengthening of the true bonds of 

conjugal affection, coupled with a rational and altogether proper 

determination on the part of individuals to accept, in so 

important a matter, nothing less than the genuine article." "If 

by a single stroke," says Professor Woods Hutchinson 

(_Contemporary Review_, Sept., 1905), "all marriage ties now in 

existence were struck off or declared illegal, eight-tenths of 

all couples would be remarried within forty eight hours, and 

seven-tenths could not be kept asunder with bayonets." An 

experiment of this kind on a small scale was witnessed in 1909 in 

an English village in Buckinghamshire. It was found that the 

parish church had never been licensed for marriages, and that in 

consequence all the people who had gone through the ceremony of 

marriage in that church during the previous half century had 

never been legally married. Yet, so far as could be ascertained, 

not a single couple thus released from the legal compulsion of 

marriage took advantage of the freedom bestowed. In the face of 

such a fact it is obviously impossible to attach any moral value 

to the form of marriage. 

 

It is certainly inevitable that during a period of transition the natural 

order is to some extent disturbed by the persistence, even though in a 

weakened form, of external bonds which are beginning to be consciously 

realized as inimical to the authoritative control of individual moral 

responsibility. We can clearly trace this at the present time. A sensitive 

anxiety to escape from external constraint induces an under-valuation of 


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