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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

will of one party. It now requires the will of two persons to form a 

marriage; law insists on that condition.[352] It is logical as well as 

just that law should take the next step involved by the historical 

evolution of marriage, and equally insist that it requires the will of two 

persons to maintain a marriage. This solution is, without doubt, the only 

way of deliverance from the crudities, the indecencies, the inextricable 

complexities which are introduced into law by the vain attempt to foresee 

in detail all the possibilities of conjugal disharmony which may arise 

under the conditions of modern civilization. It is, moreover, we may rest 

assured, the only solution which the growing modern sense of personal 

responsibility in sexual matters traced in the previous chapter--the 

responsibility of women as well as of men--will be content to accept. 

 

The subtle and complex character of the sexual relationships in a 

high civilization and the unhappy results of their State 

regulation were well expressed by Wilhelm von Humboldt in his 

_Ideen zu einen Versuch die Grenzen der Wirksamkeit des Staates 

zu bestimmen_, so long ago as 1792. "A union so closely allied 

with the very nature of the respective individuals must be 

attended with the most hurtful consequences when the State 

attempts to regulate it by law, or, through the force of its 

institutions, to make it repose on anything save simple 

inclination. When we remember, moreover, that the State can only 

contemplate the final results of such regulations on the race, we 

shall be still more ready to admit the justice of this 

conclusion. It may reasonably be argued that a solicitude for the 

race only conducts to the same results as the highest solicitude 

for the most beautiful development of the inner man. For, after 

careful observation, it has been found that the uninterrupted 

union of one man with one woman is most beneficial to the race, 

and it is likewise undeniable that no other union springs from 

true, natural, harmonious love. And further, it may be observed, 

that such love leads to the same results as those very relations 

which law and custom tend to establish. The radical error seems 

to be that the law commands; whereas such a relation cannot mould 

itself according to external arrangements, but depends wholly on 

inclination; and wherever coercion or guidance comes into 

collision with inclination, they divert it still farther from the 

proper path. Wherefore it appears to me that the State should not 

only loosen the bonds in this instance and leave ampler freedom 

to the citizen, but that it should entirely withdraw its active 

solicitude from the institution of marriage, and, both generally 

and in its particular modifications, should rather leave it 

wholly to the free choice of the individuals, and the various 

contracts they may enter into with respect to it. I should not be 

deterred from the adoption of this principle by the fear that all 

family relations might be disturbed, for, although such a fear 

might be justified by considerations of particular circumstances 

and localities, it could not fairly be entertained in an inquiry 

into the nature of men and States in general. For experience 

frequently convinces us that just where law has imposed no 

fetters, morality most surely binds; the idea of external 

coercion is one entirely foreign to an institution which, like 

marriage, reposes only on inclination and an inward sense of 


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