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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

indeed, surprising that the American people, usually intolerant of State 

interference, should in this matter so long have tolerated such 

interference in so private a matter. 

 

The movement of divorce is not confined to Christendom; it is a mark of 

modern civilization. In Japan the proportion of divorces is higher than in 

any other country, not excluding the United States.[349] The most vigorous 

and progressive countries are those that insist most firmly on the purity 

of sexual unions. In the United States it was pointed out many years ago 

that divorce is most prevalent where the standard of education and 

morality is highest. It was the New England States, with strong Puritanic 

traditions of moral freedom, which took the lead in granting facility to 

divorce. The divorce movement is not, as some have foolishly supposed, a 

movement making for immorality.[350] Immorality is the inevitable 

accompaniment of indissoluble marriage; the emphasis on the sanctity of a 

merely formal union discourages the growth of moral responsibility as 

regards the hypothetically unholy unions which grow up beneath its shadow. 

To insist, on the other hand, by establishing facility of divorce, that 

sexual unions shall be real, is to work in the cause of morality. The 

lands in which divorce by mutual consent has prevailed longest are 

probably among the most, and not the least, moral of lands. 

 

Surprise has been expressed that although divorce by mutual consent 

commended itself as an obviously just and reasonable measure two thousand 

years ago to the legally-minded Romans that solution has even yet been so 

rarely attained by modern states.[351] Wherever society is established on 

a solidly organized basis and the claims of reason and humanity receive 

due consideration--even when the general level of civilization is not in 

every respect high--there we find a tendency to divorce by mutual consent. 

 

In Japan, according to the new Civil Code, much as in ancient 

Rome, marriage is effected by giving notice of the fact to the 

registrar in the presence of two witnesses, and with the consent 

(in the case of young couples) of the heads of their families. 

There may be a ceremony, but it is not demanded by the law. 

Divorce is effected in exactly the same way, by simply having the 

registration cancelled, provided both husband and wife are over 

twenty-five years of age. For younger couples unhappily married, 

and for cases in which mutual consent cannot be obtained, 

judicial divorce exists. This is granted for various specific 

causes, of which the most important is "grave insult, such as to 

render living together unbearable" (Ernest W. Clement, "The New 

Woman in Japan," _American Journal Sociology_, March, 1903). Such 

a system, like so much else achieved by Japanese organization, 

seems reasonable, guarded, and effective. 

 

In the very different and far more ancient marriage system of 

China, divorce by mutual consent is equally well-established. 

Such divorce by mutual consent takes place for incompatibility of 

temperament, or when both husband and wife desire it. There are, 

however, various antiquated and peculiar provisions in the 

Chinese marriage laws, and divorce is compulsory for the wife's 

adultery or serious physical injuries inflicted by either party 

on the other. (The marriage laws of China are fully set forth by 

Paul d'Enjoy, _La Revue_, Sept. 1, 1905.) 

 

Among the Eskimo (who, as readers of Nansen's fascinating books 

on their morals will know, are in some respects a highly 

socialized people) the sexes are absolutely equal, marriages are 


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