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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

usually, it is not always, the husband who is the brute--is of an 

atrocious and heart-rending character (_Report on Marriage and 

Divorce in the United States_, issued by Hon. Carroll D. Wright, 

Commissioner of Labor, 1889). But even in many of the apparently 

trivial cases--as of a husband who will not wash, and a wife who 

is constantly evincing a hasty temper--it must be admitted that 

circumstances which, in the more ordinary relationships of life 

may be tolerated, become intolerable in the intimate relationship 

of sexual union. As a matter of fact, it has been found by 

careful investigation that the American courts weigh well the 

cases that come before them, and are not careless in the granting 

of decrees of divorce. 

 

In 1859 an exaggerated importance was attached to the gross 

reasons for divorce, to the neglect of subtle but equally fatal 

impediments to the continuance of marriage. This was pointed out 

by Gladstone, who was opposed to making adultery a cause of 

divorce at all. "We have many causes," he said, "more fatal to 

the great obligation of marriage, as disease, idiocy, crime 

involving punishment for life." Nowadays we are beginning to 

recognize not only such causes as these, but others of a far more 

intimate character which, as Milton long ago realized, cannot be 

embodied in statutes, or pleaded in law courts. The matrimonial 

bond is not merely a physical union, and we have to learn that, 

as the author of _The Question of English Divorce_ (p. 49) 

remarks, "other than physical divergencies are, in fact, by far 

the most important of the originating causes of matrimonial 

disaster." 

 

In England and Wales more husbands than wives petition for 

divorce, the wives who petition being about 40 per cent, of the 

whole. Divorces are increasing, though the number is not large, 

in 1907 about 1,300, of whom less than half remarried. The 

inadequacy of the divorce law is shown by the fact that during 

the same year about 7,000 orders for judicial separation were 

issued by magistrates. These separation orders not only do not 

give the right to remarry, but they make it impossible to obtain 

divorce. They are, in effect, an official permission to form 

relationships outside State marriage. 

 

 

In the United States during the years 1887-1906 nearly 40 per 

cent, of the divorces granted were for "desertion," which is 

variously interpreted in different States, and must often mean a 

separation by mutual consent. Of the remainder, 19 per cent, were 

for unfaithfulness, and the same proportion for cruelty; but 

while the divorces granted to husbands for the infidelity of 

their wives are nearly three times as great proportionately as 

those granted to wives for their husband's adultery, with regard 

to cruelty it is the reverse, wives obtaining 27 per cent, of 

their divorces on that ground and husbands only 10 per cent. 

 

In Prussia divorce is increasing. In 1907 there were eight 

thousand divorces, the cause in half the cases being adultery, 

and in about a thousand cases malicious desertion. In cases of 

desertion the husbands were the guilty parties nearly twice as 

often as the wives, in cases of adultery only a fifth to an 

eighth part. 

 

 

 


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