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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

cent. of the inmates of four asylums for the blind in England owed their 

blindness to this cause.[232] In German asylums Reinhard found that thirty 

per cent. lost their sight from the same cause. The total number of 

persons blind from gonorrhoeal infection from their mothers at birth is 

enormous. The British Royal Commission on the Condition of the Blind 

estimated there were about seven thousand persons in the United Kingdom 

alone (or twenty-two per cent. of the blind persons in the country) who 

became blind as the result of this disease, and Mookerji stated in his 

address on Ophthalmalogy at the Indian Medical Congress of 1894 that in 

Bengal alone there were six hundred thousand totally blind beggars, forty 

per cent. of whom lost their sight at birth through maternal gonorrhoea; 

and this refers to the beggar class alone. 

 

Although gonorrhoea is liable to produce many and various calamities,[233] 

there can be no doubt that the majority of gonorrhoeal persons escape 

either suffering or inflicting any very serious injury. The special reason 

why gonorrhoea has become so peculiarly serious a scourge is its extreme 

prevalence. It is difficult to estimate the proportion of men and women in 

the general population who have had gonorrhoea, and the estimates vary 

within wide limits. They are often set too high. Erb, of Heidelberg, 

anxious to disprove exaggerated estimates of the prevalence of gonorrhoea, 

went over the records of two thousand two hundred patients in his private 

practice (excluding all hospital patients) and found the proportion of 

those who had suffered from gonorrhoea was 48.5 per cent. 

 

Among the working classes the disease is much less prevalent than among 

higher-class people. In a Berlin Industrial Sick Club, 412 per 10,000 men 

and 69 per 10,000 women had gonorrhoea in a year; taking a series of years 

the Club showed a steady increase in the number of men, and decrease in 

the number of women, with venereal infection; this seems to indicate that 

the laboring classes are beginning to have intercourse more with 

prostitutes and less with respectable girls.[234] In America Wood Ruggles 

has given (as had Noggerath previously, for New York), the prevalence of 

gonorrhoea among adult males as from 75 to 80 per cent.; Tenney places it 

much lower, 20 per cent. for males and 5 per cent. for females. In 

England, a writer in the _Lancet_, some years ago,[235] found as the 

result of experience and inquiries that 75 per cent. adult males have had 

gonorrhoea once, 40 per cent. twice, 15 per cent. three or more times. 

According to Dulberg about twenty per cent. of new cases occur in married 

men of good social class, the disease being comparatively rare among 

married men of the working class in England. 

 

Gonorrhoea in its prevalence is thus only second to measles and in the 

gravity of its results scarcely second to tuberculosis. "And yet," as 

Grandin remarks in comparing gonorrhoea to tuberculosis, "witness the 

activity of the crusade against the latter and the criminal apathy 

displayed when the former is concerned."[236] The public must learn to 

understand, another writer remarks, that "gonorrhoea is a pest that 

concerns its highest interests and most sacred relations as much as do 

smallpox, cholera, diphtheria, or tuberculosis."[237] 

 

It cannot fairly be said that no attempts have been made to beat back the 

flood of venereal disease. On the contrary, such attempts have been made 

from the first. But they have never been effectual;[238] they have never 

been modified to changed condition; at the present day they are 

hopelessly unscientific and entirely opposed alike to the social and the 


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