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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

any other European army.[230] The British army, however, being 

professional and not national, is less representative of the people than 

is the case in countries where some form of conscription prevails. At one 

London hospital it could be ascertained that ten per cent. of the patients 

had had syphilis; this probably means a real proportion of about fifteen 

per cent., a high though not extremely high ratio. Yet it is obvious that 

even if the ratio is really lower than this the national loss in life and 

health, in defective procreation and racial deterioration, must be 

enormous and practically incalculable. Even in cash the venereal budget is 

comparable in amount to the general budget of a great nation. Stritch 

estimates that the cost to the British nation of venereal diseases in the 

army, navy and Government departments alone, amounts annually to 

L3,000,000, and when allowance is made for superannuations and sick-leave 

indirectly occasioned through these diseases, though not appearing in the 

returns as such, the more accurate estimate of the cost to the nation is 

stated to be L7,000,000. The adoption of simple hygienic measures for the 

prevention and the speedy cure of venereal diseases will be not only 

indirectly but even directly a source of immense wealth to the nation. 

 

Syphilis is the most obviously and conspicuously appalling of the venereal 

diseases. Yet it is less frequent and in some respects less dangerously 

insidious than the other chief venereal disease, gonorrhoea.[231] 

At one time the serious nature of gonorrhoea, especially in women, was 

little realized. Men accepted it with a light heart as a trivial accident; 

women ignored it. This failure to realize the gravity of gonorrhoea, even 

sometimes on the part of the medical profession--so that it has been 

popularly looked upon, in Grandin's words, as of little more significance 

than a cold in the nose--has led to a reaction on the part of some towards 

an opposite extreme, and the risks and dangers of gonorrhoea have been 

even unduly magnified. This is notably the case as regards sterility. The 

inflammatory results of gonorrhoea are indubitably a potent cause of 

sterility in both sexes; some authorities have stated that not only eighty 

per cent. of the deaths from inflammatory diseases of the pelvic organs 

and the majority of the cases of chronic invalidism in women, but ninety 

per cent. of involuntary sterile marriages, are due to gonorrhoea. 

Neisser, a great authority, ascribes to this disease without doubt fifty 

per cent, of such marriages. Even this estimate is in the experience of 

some observers excessive. It is fully proved that the great majority of 

men who have had gonorrhoea, even if they marry within two years of being 

infected, fail to convey the disease to their wives, and even of the women 

infected by their husbands more than half have children. This is, for 

instance, the result of Erb's experience, and Kisch speaks still more 

strongly in the same sense. Bumm, again, although regarding gonorrhoea as 

one of the two chief causes of sterility in women, finds that it is not 

the most frequent cause, being only responsible for about one-third of the 

cases; the other two-thirds are due to developmental faults in the genital 

organs. Dunning in America has reached results which are fairly concordant 

with Bumm's. 

 

With regard to another of the terrible results of gonorrhoea, the part it 

plays in producing life-long blindness from infection of the eyes at 

birth, there has long been no sort of doubt. The Committee of the 

Ophthalmological Society in 1884, reported that thirty to forty-one per 


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