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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

triumph--so slow and subtle that its history is difficult to trace--of 

Christian priests over the private affairs of men and women. Before they 

set themselves to this task marriage everywhere was the private business 

of the persons concerned; when they had completed their task,--and it was 

not absolutely complete until the Council of Trent,--a private marriage 

had become a sin and almost a crime.[326] 

 

It may seem a matter for surprise that the Church which, as we know, had 

shown an ever greater tendency to reverence virginity and to cast 

contumely on the sexual relationship, should yet, parallel with that 

movement and with the growing influence of asceticism, have shown so great 

an anxiety to capture marriage and to confer on it a public, dignified, 

and religious character. There was, however, no contradiction. The factors 

that were constituting European marriage, taken as a whole, were indeed of 

very diverse characters and often involved unreconciled contradictions. 

But so far as the central efforts of the ecclesiastical legislators were 

concerned, there was a definite and intelligible point of view. The very 

depreciation of the sexual instinct involved the necessity, since the 

instinct could not be uprooted, of constituting for it a legitimate 

channel, so that ecclesiastical matrimony was, it has been said, 

"analogous to a license to sell intoxicating liquors."[327] Moreover, 

matrimony exhibited the power of the Church to confer on the license a 

dignity and distinction which would clearly separate it from the general 

stream of lust. Sexual enjoyment is impure, the faithful cannot partake of 

it until it has been purified by the ministrations of the Church. The 

solemnization of marriage was the necessary result of the sanctification 

of virginity. It became necessary to sanctify marriage also, and hence 

was developed the indissoluble sacrament of matrimony. The conception of 

marriage as a religious sacrament, a conception of far-reaching influence, 

is the great contribution of the Catholic Church to the history of 

marriage. 

 

 

 

 


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