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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

With the acceptance of the tendency to monogamy we are not at the 

end of sexual morality, but only at the beginning. It is not 

monogamy that is the main thing, but the kind of lives that 

people lead in monogamy. The mere acceptance of a monogamic rule 

carries us but a little way. That is a fact which cannot fail to 

impress itself on those who approach the questions of sex from 

the psychological side. 

 

If monogamy is thus firmly based it is unreasonable to fear, or to hope 

for, any radical modification in the institution of marriage, regarded, 

not under its temporary religious and legal aspects but as an order which 

appeared on the earth even earlier than man. Monogamy is the most natural 

expression of an impulse which cannot, as a rule, be so adequately 

realized in full fruition under conditions involving a less prolonged 

period of mutual communion and intimacy. Variations, regarded as 

inevitable oscillations around the norm, are also natural, but union in 

couples must always be the rule because the numbers of the sexes are 

always approximately equal, while the needs of the emotional life, even 

apart from the needs of offspring, demand that such unions based on mutual 

attraction should be so far as possible permanent. 

 

It must here again be repeated that it is the reality, and not 

the form or the permanence of the marriage union, which is its 

essential and valuable part. It is not the legal or religious 

formality which sanctifies marriage, it is the reality of the 

marriage which sanctifies the form. Fielding has satirized in 

Nightingale, Tom Jones's friend, the shallow-brained view of 

connubial society which degrades the reality of marriage to exalt 

the form. Nightingale has the greatest difficulty in marrying a 

girl with whom he has already had sexual relations, although he 

is the only man who has had relations with her. To Jones's 

arguments he replies: "Common-sense warrants all you say, but yet 

you well know that the opinion of the world is so contrary to it, 

that were I to marry a whore, though my own, I should be ashamed 

of ever showing my face again." It cannot be said that Fielding's 

satire is even yet out of date. Thus in Prussia, according to 

Adele Schreiber ("Heirathsbeschraenkungen," _Die Neue Generation_, 

Feb., 1909), it seems to be still practically impossible for a 

military officer to marry the mother of his own illegitimate 

child. 

 

The glorification of the form at the expense of the reality of 

marriage has even been attempted in poetry by Tennyson in the 

least inspired of his works, _The Idylls of the King_. In 

"Lancelot and Elaine" and "Guinevere" (as Julia Magruder points 

out, _North American Review_, April, 1905) Guinevere is married 

to King Arthur, whom she has never seen, when already in love 

with Lancelot, so that the "marriage" was merely a ceremony, and 

not a real marriage (cf., May Child, "The Weird of Sir Lancelot," 

_North American Review_, Dec., 1908). 

 

It may seem to some that so conservative an estimate of the tendencies of 

civilization in matters of sexual love is due to a timid adherence to mere 

tradition. That is not the case. We have to recognize that marriage is 

firmly held in position by the pressure of two opposing forces. There are 

two currents in the stream of our civilization: one that moves towards an 

ever greater social order and cohesion, the other that moves towards an 

ever greater individual freedom. There is real harmony underlying the 

apparent opposition of these two tendencies, and each is indeed the 


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