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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

women, notwithstanding the modesty and reserve of women. The 

sexual sphere is immensely larger in women, so that when its 

activity is once aroused it is much more difficult to master or 

control. (The reasons were set out in detail in the discussion of 

"The Sexual Impulse in Women" in volume iii of these _Studies_.) 

It is, therefore, unfair to women, and unduly favors men, when 

too heavy a premium is placed on forethought and self-restraint 

in sexual matters. Since women play the predominant part in the 

sexual field their natural demands, rather than those of men, 

must furnish the standard. 

 

With the realization of the moral responsibility of women the natural 

relations of life spring back to their due biological adjustment. 

Motherhood is restored to its natural sacredness. It becomes the concern 

of the woman herself, and not of society nor of any individual, to 

determine the conditions under which the child shall be conceived. Society 

is entitled to require that the father shall in every case acknowledge the 

fact of his paternity, but it must leave the chief responsibility for all 

the circumstances of child-production to the mother. That is the point of 

view which is now gaining ground in all civilized lands both in theory and 

in practice.[311] 

 

 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[257] E.g., E. Belfort Bax, _Outspoken Essays_, p. 6. 

 

[258] Such reasons are connected with communal welfare. "All immoral acts 

result in communal unhappiness, all moral acts in communal happiness," as 

Prof. A. Mathews remarks, "Science and Morality," _Popular Science 

Monthly_, March, 1909. 

 

[259] See Westermarck, _Origin and Development of the Moral Ideas_, vol. 

i, pp. 386-390, 522. 

 

[260] Westermarck, _Origin and Development of the Moral Ideas_, pp. 9, 

159; also the whole of Ch. VII. Actions that are in accordance with custom 

call forth public approval, actions that are opposed to custom call forth 

public resentment, and Westermarck powerfully argues that such approval 

and such resentment are the foundation of moral judgments. 

 

[261] This is well recognized by legal writers (e.g., E.A. Schroeder, _Das 

Recht in der Geschlechtlichen Ordnung_, p. 5). 

 

[262] W.G. Sumner (_Folkways_, p. 418) even considers it desirable to 

change the form of the word in order to emphasize the real and fundamental 

meaning of morals, and proposes the word _mores_ to indicate "popular 

usages and traditions conducive to societal reform." "'Immoral,'" he 

points out, "never means anything but contrary to the _mores_ of the time 

and place." There is, however, no need whatever to abolish or to 

supplement the good old ancient word "morality," so long as we clearly 

realize that, on the practical side, it means essentially custom. 

 

[263] Westermarck, op. cit., vol. i, p. 19. 

 

[264] See, e.g., "Exogamy and the Mating of Cousins," in _Essays Presented 

to E.B. Tylor_, 1907, p. 53. "In many departments of primitive life we 

find a naive desire to, as it were, assist Nature, to affirm what is 

normal, and later to confirm it by the categorical imperative of custom 

and law. This tendency still flourishes in our civilized communities, and, 

as the worship of the normal, is often a deadly foe to the abnormal and 

eccentric, and too often paralyzes originality." 

 

[265] The spirit of Christianity, as illustrated by Paulinus, in his 

_Epistle XXV_, was from the Roman point of view, as Dill remarks (_Roman 

Society_, p. 11), "a renunciation, not only of citizenship, but of all the 

hard-won fruits of civilization and social life." 

 

[266] It thus happens that, as Lecky said in his _History of European 


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