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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

with complete sexual responsibility as is the patriarchal marriage system 

with which it has been so closely associated. It is an arrangement mainly 

determined by the demands of men, to whatever extent it may have 

incidentally subserved various needs of women. Men arranged that one group 

of women should be set apart to minister exclusively to their sexual 

necessities, while another group should be brought up in asceticism as 

candidates for the privilege of ministering to their household and family 

necessities. That this has been in many respects a most excellent 

arrangement is sufficiently proved by the fact that it has nourished for 

so long a period, notwithstanding the influences that are antagonistic to 

it. But it is obviously only possible during a certain stage of 

civilization and in association with a certain social organization. It is 

not completely congruous with a democratic stage of civilization involving 

the economic independence and the sexual responsibility of both sexes 

alike in all social classes. It is possible that women may begin to 

realize this fact earlier than men. 

 

It is also believed by many that women will realize that a high degree of 

moral responsibility is not easily compatible with the practice of 

dissimulation and that economic independence will deprive deceit--which is 

always the resort of the weak--of whatever moral justification it may 

possess. Here, however, it is necessary to speak with caution or we may be 

unjust to women. It must be remarked that in the sphere of sex men also 

are often the weak, and are therefore apt to resort to the refuge of the 

weak. With the recognition of that fact we may also recognize that 

deception in women has been the cause of much of the age-long blunders of 

the masculine mind in the contemplation of feminine ways. Men have 

constantly committed the double error of overlooking the dissimulation of 

women and of over-estimating it. This fact has always served to render 

more difficult still the inevitably difficult course of women through the 

devious path of sexual behavior. Pepys, who represents so vividly and so 

frankly the vices and virtues of the ordinary masculine mind, tells how 

one day when he called to see Mrs. Martin her sister Doll went out for a 

bottle of wine and came back indignant because a Dutchman had pulled her 

into a stable and tumbled and tossed her. Pepys having been himself often 

permitted to take liberties with her, it seemed to him that her 

indignation with the Dutchman was "the best instance of woman's falseness 

in the world."[307] He assumes without question that a woman who has 

accorded the privilege of familiarity to a man she knows and, one hopes, 

respects, would be prepared to accept complacently the brutal attentions 

of the first drunken stranger she meets in the street. 

 

It was the assumption of woman's falseness which led the ultra-masculine 

Pepys into a sufficiently absurd error. At this point, indeed, we 

encounter what has seemed to some a serious obstacle to the full moral 

responsibility of women. Dissimulation, Lombroso and Ferrero argue, is in 

woman "almost physiological," and they give various grounds for this 

conclusion.[308] The theologians, on their side, have reached a similar 

conclusion. "A confessor must not immediately believe a woman's words," 

says Father Gury, "for women are habitually inclined to lie."[309] This 

tendency, which seems to be commonly believed to affect women as a sex, 

however free from it a vast number of individual women are, may be said, 

and with truth, to be largely the result of the subjection of women and 


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