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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

There can be no doubt that the entrance of women into the field 

of industrial work, in rivalry with men and under somewhat the 

same conditions as men, raises serious questions of another 

order. The general tendency of civilization towards the economic 

independence and the moral responsibility of women is 

unquestionable. But it is by no means absolutely clear that it is 

best for women, and, therefore, for the community, that women 

should exercise all the ordinary avocations and professions of 

men on the same level as men. Not only have the conditions of the 

avocations and professions developed in accordance with the 

special aptitudes of men, but the fact that the sexual processes 

by which the race is propagated demand an incomparably greater 

expenditure of time and energy on the part of women than of men, 

precludes women in the mass from devoting themselves so 

exclusively as men to industrial work. For some biologists, 

indeed, it seems clear that outside the home and the school women 

should not work at all. "Any nation that works its women is 

damned," says Woods Hutchinson (_The Gospel According to Darwin_, 

p. 199). That view is extreme. Yet from the economic side, also, 

Hobson, in summing up this question, regards the tendency of 

machine-industry to drive women away from the home as "a tendency 

antagonistic to civilization." The neglect of the home, he 

states, is, "on the whole, the worst injury modern industry has 

inflicted on our lives, and it is difficult to see how it can be 

compensated by any increase of material products. Factory life 

for women, save in extremely rare cases, saps the physical and 

moral health of the family. The exigencies of factory life are 

inconsistent with the position of a good mother, a good wife, or 

the maker of a home. Save in extreme circumstances, no increase 

of the family wage can balance these losses, whose values stand 

upon a higher qualitative level" (J.A. Hobson, _Evolution of 

Modern Capitalism_, Ch. XII; cf. what has been said in Ch. I of 

the present volume). It is now beginning to be recognized that 

the early pioneers of the "woman's movement" in working to remove 

the "subjection of woman" were still dominated by the old ideals 

of that subjection, according to which the masculine is in all 

main respects the superior sex. Whatever was good for man, they 

thought, must be equally good for woman. That has been the source 

of all that was unbalanced and unstable, sometimes both a little 

pathetic and a little absurd, in the old "woman's movement." 

There was a failure to perceive that, first of all, women must 

claim their right to their own womanhood as mothers of the race, 

and thereby the supreme law-givers in the sphere of sex and the 

large part of life dependent on sex. This special position of 

woman seems likely to require a readjustment of economic 

conditions to their needs, though it is not likely that such 

readjustment would be permitted to affect their independence or 

their responsibility. We have had, as Madame Juliette Adam has 

put it, the rights of men sacrificing women, followed by the 

rights of women sacrificing the child; that must be followed by 

the rights of the child reconstituting the family. It has already 

been necessary to touch on this point in the first chapter of 

this volume, and it will again be necessary in the last chapter. 

 

The question as to the method by which the economic independence of women 

will be completely insured, and the part which the community may be 


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