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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

Law and custom assumed that a woman should be more or less under the 

protection of a man, and even the ideals of fine womanhood which arose in 

this society, during feudal and later times, were necessarily tinged by 

the same conception. It involved the inequality of women as compared with 

men, but under the social conditions of a feudal society such inequality 

was to woman's advantage. Masculine force was the determining factor in 

life and it was necessary that every woman should have a portion of this 

force on her side. This sound and reasonable idea naturally tended to 

persist even after the growth of civilization rendered force a much less 

decisive factor in social life. In England in Queen Elizabeth's time no 

woman must be masterless, although the feminine subjects of Queen 

Elizabeth had in their sovereign the object lesson of a woman who could 

play a very brilliant and effective part in life and yet remain absolutely 

masterless. Still later, in the eighteenth century, even so fine a 

moralist as Shaftesbury, in his _Characteristics_, refers to lovers of 

married women as invaders of property. If such conceptions still ruled 

even in the best minds, it is not surprising that in the same century, 

even in the following century, they were carried out into practice by less 

educated people who frankly bought and sold women. 

 

 

 

Schrader, in his _Reallexicon_ (art. "Brautkauf"), points out 

that, originally, the purchase of a wife was the purchase of her 

person, and not merely of the right of protecting her. The 

original conception probably persisted long in Great Britain on 

account of its remoteness from the centres of civilization. In 

the eleventh century Gregory VII desired Lanfranc to stop the 

sale of wives in Scotland and elsewhere in the island of the 

English (Pike, _History of Crime in England_, vol. i, p. 99). The 

practice never quite died out, however, in remote country 

districts. 

 

 

 

Such transactions have taken place even in London. Thus in the 

_Annual Register_ for 1767 (p. 99) we read: "About three weeks 

ago a bricklayer's laborer at Marylebone sold a woman, whom he 

had cohabited with for several years, to a fellow-workman for a 

quarter guinea and a gallon of beer. The workman went off with 

the purchase, and she has since had the good fortune to have a 

legacy of L200, and some plate, left her by a deceased uncle in 

Devonshire. The parties were married last Friday." 

 

The Rev. J. Edward Vaux (_Church Folk-lore_, second edition, p. 

146) narrates two authentic cases in which women had been bought 

by their husbands in open market in the nineteenth century. In 

one case the wife, with her own full consent, was brought to 

market with a halter round her neck, sold for half a crown, and 

led to her new home, twelve miles off by the new husband who had 

purchased her; in the other case a publican bought another man's 

wife for a two-gallon jar of gin. 

 

It is the same conception of woman as property which, even to the 

present, has caused the retention in many legal codes of clauses 

rendering a man liable to pay pecuniary damages to a woman, 

previously a virgin, whom he has intercourse with and 

subsequently forsakes (Natalie Fuchs, "Die Jungfernschaft im 

Recht und Sitte," _Sexual-Probleme_, Feb., 1908). The woman is 

"dishonored" by sexual intercourse, depreciated in her market 

value, exactly as a new garment becomes "second-hand," even if it 

has but once been worn. A man, on the other hand, would disdain 

the idea that his personal value could be diminished by any 


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