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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

paid to prenuptial chastity and that marriage contracts placed no stress 

on virginity indicate the absence of the conception of women as property. 

More than three thousand five hundred years ago men and women were 

recognized as equal in Egypt. The high position of the Egyptian woman is 

significantly indicated by the fact that her child was never illegitimate; 

illegitimacy was not recognized even in the case of a slave woman's 

child.[282] "It is the glory of Egyptian morality," says Amelineau, "to 

have been the first to express the Dignity of Woman."[283] The idea of 

marital authority was altogether unknown in Egypt. There can be no doubt 

that the high status of woman in two civilizations so stable, so vital, so 

long-lived, and so influential on human culture as Babylonia and Egypt, is 

a fact of much significance. 

 

Among the Jews there seems to have been no intermediate stage of 

subordination of women, but instead a gradual progress throughout 

from complete subjection of the woman as wife to ever greater 

freedom. At first the husband could repudiate his wife at will 

without cause. (This was not an extension of patriarchal 

authority, but a purely marital authority.) The restrictions on 

this authority gradually increased, and begin to be observable 

already in the Book of Deuteronomy. The Mishnah went further and 

forbade divorce whenever the wife's condition inspired pity (as 

in insanity, captivity, etc.). By A.D. 1025, divorce was no 

longer possible except for legitimate reasons or by the wife's 

consent. At the same time, the wife also began to acquire the 

right of divorce in the form of compelling the husband to 

repudiate her on penalty of punishment in case of refusal. On 

divorce the wife became an independent woman in her own right, 

and was permitted to carry off the dowry which her husband gave 

her on marriage. Thus, notwithstanding Jewish respect for the 

letter of the law, the flexible jurisprudence of the Rabbis, in 

harmony with the growth of culture, accorded an ever-growing 

measure of sexual justice and equality to women (D.W. Amram, _The 

Jewish Law of Divorce_). 

 

Among the Arabs the tendency of progress has also been favorable 

to women in many respects, especially as regards inheritance. 

Before Mahommed, in accordance with the system prevailing at 

Medina, women had little or no right of inheritance. The 

legislation of the Koran modified this rule, without entirely 

abolishing it, and placed women in a much better position. This 

is attributed largely to the fact that Mahommed belonged not to 

Medina, but to Mecca, where traces of matriarchal custom still 

survived (W. Marcais, _Des Parents et des Allies Successibles en 

Droit Musulman_). 

 

It may be pointed out--for it is not always realized--that even 

that stage of civilization--when it occurs--which involves the 

subordination and subjection of woman and her rights really has 

its origin in the need for the protection of women, and is 

sometimes even a sign of the acquirement of new privileges by 

women. They are, as it were, locked up, not in order to deprive 

them of their rights, but in order to guard those rights. In the 

later more stable phase of civilization, when women are no longer 

exposed to the same dangers, this motive is forgotten and the 

guardianship of woman and her rights seems, and indeed has really 

become, a hardship rather than an advantage. 

 

Of the status of women at Rome in the earliest periods we know little or 

nothing; the patriarchal system was already firmly established when Roman 


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