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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

gynaecocracy in Lycia, we know that women in all these regions of Asia 

Minor enjoyed high consideration and influence, traces of which may be 

detected in the early literature and history of Christianity. A decisive 

and better known example of the favorable influence of mother-descent on 

the status of woman is afforded by the _beena_ marriage of early Arabia. 

Under such a system the wife is not only preserved from the subjection 

involved by purchase, which always casts upon her some shadow of the 

inferiority belonging to property, but she herself is the owner of the 

tent and the household property, and enjoys the dignity always involved by 

the possession of property and the ability to free herself from her 

husband.[276] 

 

It is also impossible to avoid connecting the primitive tendency to 

mother-descent, and the emphasis it involved on maternal rather than 

paternal generative energy, with the tendency to place the goddess rather 

than the god in the forefront of primitive pantheons, a tendency which 

cannot possibly fail to reflect honor on the sex to which the supreme 

deity belongs, and which may be connected with the large part which 

primitive women often play in the functions of religion. Thus, according 

to traditions common to all the central tribes of Australia, the woman 

formerly took a much greater share in the performance of sacred ceremonies 

which are now regarded as coming almost exclusively within the masculine 

province, and in at least one tribe which seems to retain ancient 

practices the women still actually take part in these ceremonies.[277] It 

seems to have been much the same in Europe. We observe, too, both in the 

Celtic pantheon and among Mediterranean peoples, that while all the 

ancient divinities have receded into the dim background yet the goddesses 

loom larger than the gods.[278] In Ireland, where ancient custom and 

tradition have always been very tenaciously preserved, women retained a 

very high position, and much freedom both before and after marriage. 

"Every woman," it was said, "is to go the way she willeth freely," and 

after marriage she enjoyed a better position and greater freedom of 

divorce than was afforded either by the Christian Church or the English 

common law.[279] There is less difficulty in recognizing that 

mother-descent was peculiarly favorable to the high status of women when 

we realize that even under very unfavorable conditions women have been 

able to exert great pressure on the men and to resist successfully the 

attempts to tyrannize over them.[280] 

 

If we consider the status of woman in the great empires of antiquity we 

find on the whole that in their early stage, the stage of growth, as well 

as in their final stage, the stage of fruition, women tend to occupy a 

favorable position, while in their middle stage, usually the stage of 

predominating military organization on a patriarchal basis, women occupy a 

less favorable position. This cyclic movement seems to be almost a natural 

law of the development of great social groups. It was apparently well 

marked in the very stable and orderly growth of Babylonia. In the earliest 

times a Babylonian woman had complete independence and equal rights with 

her brothers and her husband; later (as shown by the code of Hamurabi) a 

woman's rights, though not her duties, were more circumscribed; in the 

still later Neo-Babylonian periods, she again acquired equal rights with 

her husband.[281] 

 

In Egypt the position of women stood highest at the end, but it seems to 

have been high throughout the whole of the long course of Egyptian 

history, and continuously improving, while the fact that little regard was 


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