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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

 

 

 

It may be said that in such a case we witness not so much the 

operation of a natural law as the influences of a great centre of 

civilization exerting its moralizing effects even on those who 

stand outside the legally recognized institution of marriage. 

That contention may, however, be thrust aside. We find exactly 

the same tendency in Jamaica where the population is largely 

colored, and the stress of a high civilization can scarcely be 

said to exist. Legal marriage is here discarded to an even 

greater extent than in London, for little care is taken to 

legitimate children by marriage. It was found by a committee 

appointed to inquire into the marriage laws of Jamaica, that 

three out of every five births are illegitimate, that is to say 

that legal illegitimacy has ceased to be immoral, having become 

the recognized custom of the majority of the inhabitants. There 

is no social feeling against illegitimacy. The men approve of the 

decay of legal marriage, because they say the women work better 

in the house when they are not married; the women approve of it, 

because they say that men are more faithful when not bound by 

legal marriage. This has been well brought out by W.P. 

Livingstone in his interesting book, _Black Jamaica_ (1899). The 

people recognize, he tells us (p. 210), that "faithful living 

together constitutes marriage;" they say that they are "married 

but not parsoned." One reason against legal marriage is that they 

are disinclined to incur the expense of the official sanction. 

(In Venezuela, it may be added, where also the majority of births 

take place outside official marriage, the chief reason is stated 

to be, not moral laxity, but the same disinclination to pay the 

expenses of legal weddings.) Frequently in later life, sometimes 

when they have grown up sons and daughters, couples go through 

the official ceremony. (In Abyssinia, also, it is stated by 

Hugues Le Roux, where the people are Christian and marriage is 

indissoluble and the ceremony expensive, it is not usual for 

married couples to make their unions legal until old age is 

coming on, _Sexual-Probleme_, April, 1908, p. 217.) It is 

significant that this condition of things in Jamaica, as 

elsewhere, is associated with the superiority of women. "The 

women of the peasant class," remarks Livingstone (p. 212), "are 

still practically independent of the men, and are frequently 

their superiors, both in physical and mental capacity." They 

refuse to bind themselves to a man who may turn out to be good 

for nothing, a burden instead of a help and protection. So long 

as the unions are free they are likely to be permanent. If made 

legal, the risk is that they will become intolerable, and cease 

by one of the parties leaving the other. "The necessity for 

mutual kindness and forbearance establishes a condition that is 

the best guarantee of permanency" (p. 214). It is said, however, 

that under the influence of religious and social pressure the 

people are becoming more anxious to adopt "respectable" ideas of 

sexual relationships, though it seems evident, in view of 

Livingstone's statement, that such respectability is likely to 

involve a decrease of real morality. Livingstone points out, 

however, one serious defect in the present conditions which makes 

it easy for immoral men to escape paternal responsibilities, and 

this is the absence of legal provision for the registration of 

the father's name on birth certificates (p. 256). In every 


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