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THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

du Droit International Prive_, Jan., 1909, fully summarized in 

_Revue des Idees_, Feb., 1909.) 

 

The movement of sexual freedom in Russia lies much deeper, 

however, than this fashion of sensual license; it is found in 

remote and uncontaminated parts of the country, and is connected 

with very ancient customs. 

 

There is considerable interest in realizing the existence of 

long-continued sexual freedom--by some incorrectly termed 

"immorality," for what is in accordance with the customs or 

_mores_ of a people cannot be immoral--among peoples so virile 

and robust, so eminently capable of splendid achievements, as the 

Germans and the Russians. There is, however, a perhaps even 

greater interest in tracing the development of the same tendency 

among new prosperous and highly progressive communities who have 

either not inherited the custom of sexual freedom or are now only 

reviving it. We may, for instance, take the case of Australia and 

New Zealand. This development may not, indeed, be altogether 

recent. The frankness of sexual freedom in Australia and the 

tolerance in regard to it were conspicuous thirty years ago to 

those who came from England to live in the Southern continent, 

and were doubtless equally visible at an earlier date. It seems, 

however, to have developed with the increase of self-conscious 

civilization. "After careful inquiry," says the Rev. H. 

Northcote, who has lived for many years in the Southern 

hemisphere (_Christianity and Sex Problems_, Ch. VIII), "the 

writer finds sufficient evidence that of recent years intercourse 

out of wedlock has tended towards an actual increase in parts of 

Australia." Coghlan, the chief authority on Australian 

statistics, states more precisely in his _Childbirth in New South 

Wales_, published a few years ago: "The prevalence of births of 

ante-nuptial conception--a matter hitherto little understood--has 

now been completely investigated. In New South Wales, during six 

years, there were 13,366 marriages, in respect of which there was 

ante-nuptial conception, and, as the total number of marriages 

was 49,641, at least twenty-seven marriages in a hundred followed 

conception. During the same period the illegitimate births 

numbered 14,779; there were, therefore, 28,145 cases of 

conception amongst unmarried women; in 13,366 instances marriage 

preceded the birth of the child, so that the children were 

legitimatized in rather more than forty-seven cases out of one 

hundred. A study of the figures of births of ante-nuptial 

conception makes it obvious that in a very large number of 

instances pre-marital intercourse is not an anticipation of 

marriage already arranged, but that the marriages are forced upon 

the parties, and would not be entered into were it not for the 

condition of the woman" (cf. Powys, _Biometrika_, vol. i, 1901-2, 

p. 30). That marriage should be, as Coghlan puts it, "forced upon 

the parties," is not, of course, desirable in the general moral 

interests, and it is also a sign of imperfect moral 

responsibility in the parties themselves. 

 

The existence of such a state of things, in a young country 

belonging to a part of the world where the general level of 

prosperity, intelligence, morality and social responsibility may 

perhaps be said to be higher than in any other region inhabited 

by people of white race, is a fact of the very first significance 

when we are attempting to forecast the direction in which 


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