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Table of contents
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.1
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.2
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.3
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.4
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.5
THE CONQUEST OF THE VENEREAL DISEASES-8.6
FOOTNOTES
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.1
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.2
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.3
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.4
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.5
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.6
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.7
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.8
SEXUAL MORALITY-9.9
MARRIAGE-10.1
MARRIAGE-10.2
MARRIAGE-10.3
MARRIAGE-10.4
MARRIAGE-10.5
MARRIAGE-10.6
MARRIAGE-10.7
MARRIAGE-10.8
MARRIAGE-10.9
MARRIAGE-10.10
MARRIAGE-10.11
MARRIAGE-10.12
FOOTNOTES
THE ART OF LOVE-11.1
THE ART OF LOVE-11.2
THE ART OF LOVE-11.3
THE ART OF LOVE-11.4
THE ART OF LOVE-11.5
THE ART OF LOVE-11.6
THE ART OF LOVE-11.7
THE ART OF LOVE-11.8
THE ART OF LOVE-11.9
THE ART OF LOVE-11.10
THE ART OF LOVE-11.11
FOOTNOTES
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.1
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.2
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.3
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.4
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.5
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.6
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.7
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.8
THE SCIENCE OF PROCREATION-12.9
FOOTNOTES
INDEX OF AUTHORS

as well as of wide inquiries among agency physicians, prepared a 

table showing that among some thirty tribes and groups of tribes, 

eighteen were almost or entirely free from venereal disease, 

while among thirteen it was very prevalent. Almost without 

exception, the tribes where syphilis is rare or unknown refuse 

sexual intercourse with strangers, while those among whom such 

disease is prevalent are morally lax. It is the whites who are 

the source of infection among these tribes (A.B. Holder, "Gynecic 

Notes Among the American Indians," _American Journal of 

Obstetrics_, 1892, No. 1). 

 

Syphilis is only one, certainly the most important, of a group of three 

entirely distinct "venereal diseases" which have only been distinguished 

in recent times, and so far as their precise nature and causation are 

concerned, are indeed only to-day beginning to be understood, although two 

of them were certainly known in antiquity. It is but seventy years ago 

since Ricord, the great French syphilologist, following Bassereau, first 

taught the complete independence of syphilis both from gonorrhoea 

and soft chancre, at the same time expounding clearly the three stages, 

primary, secondary and tertiary, through which syphilitic manifestations 

tend to pass, while the full extent of tertiary syphilitic symptoms is 

scarcely yet grasped, and it is only to-day beginning to be generally 

realized that two of the most prevalent and serious diseases of the brain 

and nervous system--general paralysis and tabes dorsalis or locomotor 

ataxia--have their predominant though not sole and exclusive cause in the 

invasion of the syphilitic poison many years before. In 1879 a new stage 

of more precise knowledge of the venereal diseases began with Neisser's 

discovery of the gonococcus which is the specific cause of gonorrhoea. 

This was followed a few years later by the discovery by Ducrey and Unna of 

the bacillus of soft chancre, the least important of the venereal diseases 

because exclusively local in its effects. Finally, in 1905--after 

Metchnikoff had prepared the way by succeeding in carrying syphilis from 

man to monkey, and Lassar, by inoculation, from monkey to monkey--Fritz 

Schaudinn made his great discovery of the protozoal _Spirochoeta 

pallida_ (since sometimes called _Treponema pallidum_), which is now 

generally regarded as the cause of syphilis, and thus revealed the final 

hiding place of one of the most dangerous and insidious foes of 

humanity.[224] 

 

There is no more subtle poison than that of syphilis. It is not, like 

smallpox or typhoid, a disease which produces a brief and sudden storm, a 

violent struggle with the forces of life, in which it tends, even without 

treatment, provided the organism is healthy, to succumb, leaving little or 

no traces of its ravages behind. It penetrates ever deeper and deeper into 

the organism, with the passage of time leading to ever new manifestations, 

and no tissue is safe from its attack. And so subtle is this all-pervading 

poison that though its outward manifestations are amenable to prolonged 

treatment, it is often difficult to say that the poison has been finally 

killed out.[225] 

 

The immense importance of syphilis, and the chief reason why it is 

necessary to consider it here, lies in the fact that its results are not 

confined to the individual himself, nor even to the persons to whom he may 

impart it by the contagion due to contact in or out of sexual 

relationships: it affects the offspring, and it affects the power to 

produce offspring. It attacks men and women at the centre of life, as the 


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